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Thread: Keeping air pressure up on a remote conventional tank system.

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  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member MMSQ's Avatar
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    Default Keeping air pressure up on a remote conventional tank system.

    So we are trying to set up a holding/pressure tank. It is going to be a conventional tank without a bladder, it is about 5,500 gallons. We want to install the tank on the uphill side of our property away from the pump and well. This will allow us flow and pressure in case of power/pump failure.

    Originally, we were going to set this up as a dedicated gravity system, but we don't have enough elevation drop for desired pressures. So now we want to pressurized the system and are trying to plan for anticipated problems.

    One problem is that the air in the tank will absorb into the water and we will lose the air pressure and volume in the tank to maintain pressure. Adding a compressor or air line to the tank are options, but not ones we want to have to go to since the tank will be installed a long way from power.

    I was wondering if I can install a bleeder and snifter valve allowing air to be injected into the tank when the pump cycles. In theory it would work, but our problem with this option is that we have only one line into and out of the tank. Tank is plummed for two, but because this was to be a gravity pressured system, my dad only planned on and burried one line- so it is the supply and discharge line depending on if the pump is running or not.

    What I need is a 3 port, dual direction check valve of some sort that would alow us to tee off and isolate a portion of pipe that would have the snifter and bleeder installed on it. It would allow flow to the tank from the pump past the bleeder and snifter when the pump is running. It would then close the supply side of the snifter/bleeder line and allow discharge out of the tank to supply the system until the pressure/water level dropped enough for the pump to cut in. If there was something that was controlled by flow of the outlet side of the valve, that would be ideal.

    If I forgot to explain something, I am sorry. Just ask me and I will try to clarify.

    Thanks for the help!

    MMSQ

  2. #2
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    A snifter and bleeder normally goes between a submersible in the well and the house, with the bleeder in the well and the snifter in the house. Where does the pump reside and how does it tie in?

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    In the Trades Texas Wellman's Avatar
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    You can put the snifter directly at the well if it's accessable. I don't know if you have a pitless adapter but if not it should be pretty simple.

    Getting the bleeder installed might be a tad bit tricky though.

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    DIY Junior Member MMSQ1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Wellman View Post
    You can put the snifter directly at the well if it's accessable. I don't know if you have a pitless adapter but if not it should be pretty simple.

    Getting the bleeder installed might be a tad bit tricky though.
    I am needing to put something in near our remote tank we are installing (remote from the pump).

    mmsq

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    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Is the 5500 gallon tank made for pressure? You know a 5500 gallon pressure tank only holds a bout 500 to 800 gallons of usuable water? Not much if you are counting on it for storage. With one line going into the tank, I think a compressor with a probe is your best option. Try White Water compressors.

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    DIY Junior Member MMSQ1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    Is the 5500 gallon tank made for pressure? You know a 5500 gallon pressure tank only holds a bout 500 to 800 gallons of usuable water? Not much if you are counting on it for storage. With one line going into the tank, I think a compressor with a probe is your best option. Try White Water compressors.
    We would rather not run a power line out to the tank, but it could be done. I was hoping there was a way to isolate a separate section of pipe on the supply side of the tank, and then discharge back through another line.

    So how are you figuring 5-800 gallons of usable water? what is usable? Are we talking drawdown before the pump cuts in?

    And as of now our tank is not a pressure tank. My dad wants to encase it in concrete to reinforce it. We are not looking for a high pressure system (ie.. probably 40-50 psi). Maybe I don't understand what is really going on with ratios in a pressure tank, but it seems that the less pressure you are trying to achieve, the more room there will be for water. But I will readily admit that wrapping my mind around all of this isn't as easy as it would first appear.

    MMSQ

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    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Add a down line, just use the tanks 5500 gal cap. and put in a small booster pump and tank at the bottom near power. Fill the tank with a low voltage valve and float switch.

    Probably wont use much more power than the air compressor.

    I understand what you mean about the check valve system at the tanks one inlet. I have sketched one out many times, but have some doubts if it would work correctly. I think I concluded that electric valves would be needed in a sequencing method.

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    DIY Junior Member MMSQ1's Avatar
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    Having a hard time logging on with the same account, so I created a new one: MMSQ1

    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    A snifter and bleeder normally goes between a submersible in the well and the house, with the bleeder in the well and the snifter in the house. Where does the pump reside and how does it tie in?
    Yes, I understand where the snifter and bleeder normally go. And that would be optimal under normal circumstances.

    The pump is about 1/3 of a mile away from where we are installing the tank. The problem is that there is only one line (Dad was initially planning on using gravity flow for pressure) going up to the tank from the pump, and it is the same line that supply lines are "T"ed off from. The "T"s are between the tank and pump. If I were to install the snifter/bleeder at the pump, I would be injecting air pockets into the supply line to the homes on our system as well as the tank.

    Thanks,
    mmsq

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