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Thread: Water Heater In-Line Pump

  1. #1

    Default Water Heater In-Line Pump

    Hello All,

    Do you guys know of a pump that can be hooked up to the drain of a hot water tank to pump the water out of a basement with no floor drain?

    Thanks

    Tom

  2. #2
    In the trades Dana's Avatar
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    http://www.amazon.com/Little-Giant-555507-Water-Transfer/dp/B0057PCGA0


    Any water-transfer utility pump that takes standard hose fittings should do ya, but be sure to open some taps to allow air to enter before turning it on.

  3. #3

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    Dana,

    Thanks for the link. Now that I know the name of the pump I can do some research and find one. That one doesn't look to bad.

    Are these kinds of pumps affected by hot water coming out of the tank?

    If so how long would I have to let the tank sit idle before pumping it out?

    Thanks

    Tom

  4. #4
    In the trades Dana's Avatar
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    You may have to dig up & read the fine print on the pump specs, but I'd be surprised if their operating temperature range crapped out anywhere near as low as 120-140F DHW temps.

  5. #5

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    I found this guy. He's made in America. I'm going to buy this one. Anyone object to the quality of this unit?

    http://www.amazon.com/Liberty-Pumps-...=3GSYO6HNMHB19

    Thanks

    Tom

  6. #6
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    http://www.bing.com/search?q=zoeller...16&sp=2&sk=AS1

    I object completely, because you'll plug and ruin the pump with the crud that comes out of the drain. You ALREADY have a wet vac, or get one for 39 bucks at true value. Drain into your turkey pan and suck it up.

    Your chosen pump is made for 100 foot of head... as the one reviewer mentioned, he hears the plastic impeller busting up the calcium - he'll soon discover that the impeller is busting up just as much. Its a great pump- but NOT for pumping debri, no matter what the MFG says. The Zoeller uses a vortex action that allows it to pump without disturbing the impeller at all. and the head is about 20'. I recall.

    Then if you want to continue, duct tape a garden hose on the vacuum, and rod out the inside of the tank. you will be shocked at the TONS of crap you will find. THEN turn the inlet cold on a bit and continue, flushing it properly.

    And THEN if you tire of carrying water, get a 9$ drill attached pump with rubber vanes that will pass the small crud.

    Hell, for 139$ you can get a USA Zoeller m53 sump pump and set that in your pan, and it passes huge solids. And you can resell it anywhere. OR you can use it to drain your flooded basement after the flood.

    Be sure to get rid of that joke plastic drain valve and do this thru the hole, replace with a ball valve or plug.

    Dana, I use your rubber impeller pump to move wine around, it will absolutely be plugged in a moment. Even with wine, a seed plugs it and I have to wrap the inlet with Stainless or copper scrubber pads. Even the 9$ drill pump will need you to settle out the solids or filter the pick up.

    Also see that your chosen pump is a brush motor - 5 to 10,000 rpm - CA-CA! the Zoeller really is US made and is a real motor.
    http://www.inspectapedia.com/plumbin..._Procedure.htm
    Last edited by ballvalve; 02-28-2012 at 02:28 PM.

  7. #7
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    I use this pump and I have used it for 5 years. Last week I took it apart to check the impeller because it came with a spare,but the impeller was fine. It runs great.
    http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...2045_200352045

    I pump from the hot outlet of the water heater not the drain valve. No problems.

  8. #8
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Great pump, self priming, got a pile of them. Just don't let it touch the bottom, or you better have a screwdriver at ready. Good way to get the water out of the house.

    THEN get out the shop vac and SUCK the junk out. If you dont rod and root around thru the drain hole, all the s&*^ is still in the bottom.

  9. #9
    In the Trades Plumber111's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hackney plumbing View Post
    I use this pump and I have used it for 5 years. Last week I took it apart to check the impeller because it came with a spare,but the impeller was fine. It runs great.
    http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...2045_200352045

    I pump from the hot outlet of the water heater not the drain valve. No problems.
    I use the same pump. Works fine. Good bang for the buck. Little rubber-flexible impeller and a spare with it. Sediment can clog it. Then you have to remove the 4 phillips head screws and clean it out.

    I hear good things and no problems from others in the business about the Liberty pump linked.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    Great pump, self priming, got a pile of them. Just don't let it touch the bottom, or you better have a screwdriver at ready. Good way to get the water out of the house.

    THEN get out the shop vac and SUCK the junk out. If you dont rod and root around thru the drain hole, all the s&*^ is still in the bottom.
    Yeah your right you cant let it get in the gunk. Usually its not too much gunk in the ones around here,usually just a couple inches.

  11. #11

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    Ballvalve,

    You have a way with words. Reading what you write is like an informational roller coaster. LOL.

    Ok so let me get this straight.

    I buy the Zoeller. I can do this.
    Replace the valve on the water tank with a high quality made in America ball valve. I can do this if it isn't already there.
    I get some kind of pan that is small enough to fit under the ball valve but big enough to set the sump pump in. (Any ideas on this one?)
    I pipe a small piece of PVC to the Zoeller and size down to 3/4" hose bib. I can do this.

    So my only three questions are

    1) Any ideas for the pan?
    2) What is going to be the best way to operate the pump?
    3) Will sizing the pipe down on the sump pump to only 3/4" hose bib cause a problem for the pump due to decreased flow?

    Thanks for all the responses guys.

    Tom

  12. #12
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote; I get some kind of pan that is small enough to fit under the ball valve but big enough to set the sump pump in.

    Doing it this way the heater will ONLY drain as fast as the debris releases the water, which could take HOURS in the worst case scenario. Connecting a pump TO THE drain sucks both the debris and water out in a very short time.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  13. #13

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    See the post below
    Last edited by statjunk; 03-01-2012 at 07:18 AM.

  14. #14

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    Ok this is turning into a mission. If I use a sump pump like a Zoeller, how can I hook it up to the tank if it sucks from the underside of the unit? Waiting a couple of hours for the tank to drain is not an option.

    Tom

  15. #15
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Shut off inlet valve. Open or remove drain valve - be careful, they like to explode if plastic. Regulate drain time by opening and closing the Pressure relief valve - allows air in.... or go open a hot water tap upstairs. Now you only need a few minutes.

    Without an air inlet, you'll just get a glug glug out the drain, as air is sucked in. When plumbers change electric heating elements for themselves, they never drain the tank, you just pull it out and get the new one in fast - maybe a gallon on the floor or a helper with a shop vac.

    I like the shop vac solution personally. You can whittle a stick from your yard as a shut off valve for your kid to hold while you dump the water into a trash can. then carry it out later or go for the zoeller and toss it in the trash-water- can. If you have enough HEIGHT under the drain valve, the Zoeller in a turkey pan works fine. Dont let it run dry.

    If its slow to drain work a stick in the drain hole.

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