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Thread: Soundproofing around a shower?

  1. #16
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    I appreciate the input.

    I had not considered the idea of a staggered stud wall. The side I am most concerned with backs to an 8' wide alcove, so it would be easy to frame up a second wall, and losing 4" in the alcove wouldn't be of great concern.

    The standard mineral wool seems to be some heavy sound-absorbent stuff.

    And drywall is cheap.

    The sheet membrane sounds interesting, but it's not worth it to me when I think I can make do with cheaper materials.

    I'm still waffling, but feel like a more educated consumer.

  2. #17
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If you go with the staggered studwall, it's more common to only lose about 1.5"...use a 2x6 on the plate and top, then use standard 2x4's offset at the standard spacing, so you have them alternating, one to one side of the wall, the next to the other while maintaining the 16" OC for both sides. That will leave you about 2" gap to the opposite wall that you can wind the insulation through, if you choose to add that as well (not a bad idea).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #18
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    John is the guy who claims everyone else is advertising for such and such, but he advertises for Nobel every chance he gets.

    This is not a tile shower.

    Everyone in the acoustical business knows that mass, decoupling, and absorption are key... I'm not really sure where John figures a waterproof membrane comes in there.

    This isn't witch craft either, there are plenty of resources on the internet that explain designs to achieve certain STC ratings...

    EDIT

    If you don't mind losing more than 1.5", you could frame a 1 5/8" steel stud wall IN FRONT of the existing wall, then the only physical connection would be subfloor and ceiling joist/rafter. I suggest steel stud not for the sound aspect, but because it's easier to frame a thin straight wall with small steel members than it is to attempt to frame a wall with 2x2/2x3 or anything else wood.
    Last edited by dlarrivee; 02-21-2012 at 05:57 PM.

  4. #19
    Bathroom Specialist Todd Stull's Avatar
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    Sounds like adding a whole bunch of steel in front of a stud wall makes sense but why would anyone go to the trouble for a $600 tub and wall kit... Throw some insulation in the wall and call it a day

  5. #20
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Stull View Post
    Sounds like adding a whole bunch of steel in front of a stud wall makes sense but why would anyone go to the trouble for a $600 tub and wall kit... Throw some insulation in the wall and call it a day
    Why bother doing anything to your home at all if the walls aren't caving in?

  6. #21
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Stull View Post
    Sounds like adding a whole bunch of steel in front of a stud wall makes sense but why would anyone go to the trouble for a $600 tub and wall kit... Throw some insulation in the wall and call it a day
    Thus the reason I would never hire someone who calls himself a "Bathroom Remodeler".


    It's really no trouble at all, because it's my house and I have nothing but time.

    When I'm watching TV in the adjacent room, I would rather not hear noise coming from the bathroom.
    It's an afterthought that obviously has many potential solutions.

    I would much rather analyze and do something decent now rather than have it bother me after the rooms are finished.
    Last edited by cacher_chick; 02-21-2012 at 09:17 PM.

  7. #22
    Bathroom Specialist Todd Stull's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cacher_chick View Post
    Thus the reason I would never hire someone who calls himself a "Bathroom Remodeler".


    It's really no trouble at all, because it's my house and I have nothing but time.

    When I'm watching TV in the adjacent room, I would rather not hear noise coming from the bathroom.
    It's an afterthought that obviously has many potential solutions.

    I would much rather analyze and do something decent now rather than have it bother me after the rooms are finished.
    That's why I recomended Insulation in the walls Others were offering some overly complicated solutions so I was just trying to keep it simple for you, that's all. Seems like dlarrivee has a problem with me for some reason or just taking frustration out on me due to the dislike of John. I did nothing wrong here. Just trying to help, My appologies.

  8. #23
    DIY Junior Member SirElliott's Avatar
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    Default What worked for me

    I had pretty much the same situation except it was a bedroom, my bedroom. The showers is my wife's and we are on opposite shifts.

    I did the staggered wall, 2" X 4" on 2" X 6" plates. I added insulation. I did go with two layers of 5/8" sheetrock. I used two products from a company called Green Glue. (I have absolutely no interest in the company) The sheetrock is separated by "Green Glue" which works with the mass of the sheetrock. Reportedly it converts the sound movement energy into heat. Green Glue comes in caulk tubes and you place it between the sheets. I also used their joist tape because we had some left over. There is an outlet in that wall which we wrapped in acoustic foam and caulk.

    The insulation was cellulose which seems better than fiberglass for sound. The gap between the floor and sheetrock was filled with acoustic caulk. Details are important in sound reduction.

    My bed is less than 3 feet from that wall and I hear nothing. My thoughts were that the incremental costs were small vs. the years of noise. I would do it again in a heartbeat.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Stull View Post
    I guess I was right,
    Sometimes buying a whole roll of roofing paper doesn't make sense if your not going to use it any time soon so another option is some silicone inbetween stud and flange to cut out squeeking.
    I can stop by any construction site and pick up all the scraps of tar paper I want to haul off...along with plywood,drywall,2x4,,etc. Its quicker than buying it.

  10. #25
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    Cacher chick,Also insulate the voids under the bathtub along with the walls. It will help hold heat longer if a tub bath is taken and will help dampen the sound.

    Goodluck with your project,I hope it turns out nice and I'm sure it will. Those sterling units are good if they are installed with care,like your doing.

  11. #26
    Bathroom Specialist Todd Stull's Avatar
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    I've installed I think 2 of the Sterling kits in the past but mainly install the Swanstone Veritek when it comes to a "kit" install. Be sure to set your base in a bed of flexable mortar like Custom's Flexbond or Laticrete 253 Gold. It will make a nice solid floor and eliminate any creeks from the subfloor.

    Was that a good informative post? Any complaints??

  12. #27
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    That's better.

    One thing we have to remember is that there are people here from all over the country, with all different levels of experience. What guys like John do in high-end houses might be different that what the common folk do, and that's OK. We can all learn from the experience of others.
    That's what I'm here for.

    The house I grew up in was built of scrap lumber & tar paper, insulated with sawdust and newspaper, and heated with nothing but a wood stove. We've come a long way.

    Thanks to all the people in this forum, my bathroom is ready to be taped.
    It is plumbed, framed, wired, and the 60" shower was set in a mortar bed months ago.
    It's been permitted and inspected.
    It's solid and there are no squeaks.

    I'm working on the adjacent rooms now, thus my post.

    Thanks to everyone for your input.
    Last edited by cacher_chick; 02-22-2012 at 04:02 PM.

  13. #28
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Stull View Post
    I've installed I think 2 of the Sterling kits in the past but mainly install the Swanstone Veritek when it comes to a "kit" install. Be sure to set your base in a bed of flexable mortar like Custom's Flexbond or Laticrete 253 Gold. It will make a nice solid floor and eliminate any creeks from the subfloor.

    Was that a good informative post? Any complaints??
    The only complaint I have is that you're really making mountains out of mole hills, when people suggest various ideas and you decide that based on the cost of ONE of the items that make up a bathroom, that it isn't WORTH doing any extra work on, I take offence.

  14. #29
    Bathroom Specialist Todd Stull's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlarrivee View Post
    The only complaint I have is that you're really making mountains out of mole hills, when people suggest various ideas and you decide that based on the cost of ONE of the items that make up a bathroom, that it isn't WORTH doing any extra work on, I take offence.
    I didn't really mean it like that but ok... Like I said before, I've installed Sterling Kits and the Swanstone Veriteks and they are both good products. I tend to veer towards the Swan side because the color selections are much better. Lately, I've added isulation to the install for those purposes so that's why I was a little one sided about the recomendation knowing that it does alot of justice. For me, the stakes raise when it's a Custom tile shower... that's when you get into the more expensive membranes and such.

  15. #30
    Bathroom Specialist Todd Stull's Avatar
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    ... a sterling kit will last 20 to 30 years as is, however, tile showers need to be built with the proper products and typically more expensive products across the board to meet that criteria.

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