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Thread: Feed from Breaker Panel

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  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member MrBillyd's Avatar
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    Default Feed from Breaker Panel

    I am in the middle of a major Kitchen/lighting remodel. I tore out some sofits and AC ducting and ran new ducting over the joist. During this job, I of course found many of my Romex wirings not over the joist and in my sofits. So, I am almost completed rerouting all of these wires so I can move on the dry wall. Before I do close it up, I need to run a 8/2 for my soon to be bought Double oven.
    I am also planning on running 2 new 14/2 15 amp breaker feeds to separate my kitchen\garage\living room lighting. I am also planning on running a 12/2 feed over across the entire length of my house that will power my out door Barbi\ Bar\ Patio ect.
    I just had my panel installed a few months ago\ so feeding these new wires up through the back of the panel and up through a brick wall cavity is not going to happen. I plan on running some conduit maybe 1inch, from a Knock out hole on the side of the panel up until it just gets into my attic. The length of this conduit would be about 3-4 feet.
    What size conduit would fit one 8/2; two 14/2 and one 12/2. Do I have to use EMT or could I use Scd 40 PVC. I think I need a 90 out of the panel and a 90 to get me into my attic. I am not sure about the code on fill capacity when using 3 different sized wires.
    The other question I had was about indoor 12/2. The indoor 12/2 is much cheaper so I planned on running it across my attic to a box. Then when I do the job out side, I would run the outdoor type cable from the box to the backyard items.

    Thanks for any thougths

    Bill

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Typically, cable is not enclosed in conduit. For a short run, for mechanical protection, it may be OK. The electricians will let us know about that.

  3. #3
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Sounds like several pulls I just made in 3/4" aluminum flex. Or blue PVC

  4. #4
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    You will find that using an LB is better than using a 90. Be sure to check if you need 8/3 with ground for the oven. I would bet that the lights and clocks are all 120 volt therefore an 8/3 would be needed.
    If you use 1 inch PVC I don’t think you will have a problem. Be sure that the knock out you choose is below the bus bars of the panel to reject water away from them. Never come into the outside panel beside of or above the bus bars.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member MrBillyd's Avatar
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    Thanks for the feed back. After looking at it deeper, I have decided to give it a go to try and route the new wires the same way as all the Original wires.
    To make this possible I am going to roto zip one of blocks a foot above my panel as I plan on a stucco job over the slump block in the near future.
    I also decided to run a 6/2 rather than a 8/2 because I am traveling 80 feet. I have down loaded 3 of the different double ovens manuals of brands that I might use. All of them call for a 40amp breaker, and they have 3 and 4 wire instructions.
    I am not sure a 6/3 would be worth the cost, as I don't have a neutral coming from the feed from the street. In my box all my neutrals are tied to the same bus bars as my grounds. In the wire instructions it says as long as I am not in a mobile home or Canada, I can tie my 6/2 ground wire to the ovens ground and N. In this house I am not sure what the 6/3 would by me?
    Bill

  6. #6
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    If you are supplying a 240/120 appliance under the NEC, you are allowed to connect an existing 3-wire circuit to an appliance, but any new circuit is required to have a separate equipment grounding conductor.

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