(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Afci circuit with gfi extension cord?

  1. #1
    sea-bee chuck b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    levering, michigan
    Posts
    72

    Default Afci circuit with gfi extension cord?

    Hi! I have rewired my enitire 800 sq. ft. cottage to code. Interior non-GFI protected circuits are wired on breaker AFCI's (non bathroom, kitchen, laundry, exterior circuits). I am thinking that when I use hi amp power tools I could benefit from connecting to an AFCI protected circuit, when using them with a GFI protected extension cord. Make sense? Thanks.

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member kreemoweet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Seattle. WA
    Posts
    371

    Default

    High-amp power tools are notorious for causing nuisance trips on GFCI devices. If you use 'em, be prepared
    to push the reset button every two minutes.

  3. #3
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Land of Cheese
    Posts
    3,154

    Default

    I'm not sure I see any need for having such protection, but there is nothing wrong doing it, and it will work.

  4. #4
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NY State, USA
    Posts
    976

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chuck b View Post
    I am thinking that when I use hi amp power tools I could benefit from connecting to an AFCI protected circuit, when using them with a GFI protected extension cord.
    I am very curious as to why you think this.

  5. #5
    sea-bee chuck b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    levering, michigan
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Guess the GFCI makes sense, but are you saying that the AFCI usage is in question? I did not mention that the wires for the AFCI are not new, and I am concerned that until I get the chance to take down walls to expose them and put in new romex, they could overheat, arc.

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,428

    Default

    You said you did things to code, so, that means that you didn't put heavier gauge receptacles or other things on wire that was too small. There should be nothing to overheat. The only time you might overheat wiring is with bad connections, or using too small wire for the protection (i.e., circuit breaker).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,659

    Default

    Circuit breakers are sized to protect the wire. If the wire overheats you used the wrong circuit breaker for it and it SHOULD be changed until the wire is upgraded.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  8. #8
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,428

    Default

    You can use heavier wire than the minimum, but you can never use wire that is smaller than the minimum for the protection device, the circuit breaker (as long as you stay within the range of acceptable wire for the device- i.e., it has to be able to fit in the clamp or screw). As long as you do that, there should never be any overheating...the protection device would trip first.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  9. #9
    Electrician ActionDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    328

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kreemoweet View Post
    High-amp power tools are notorious for causing nuisance trips on GFCI devices. If you use 'em, be prepared
    to push the reset button every two minutes.
    What power tools? How many Amps? I can't imagine any power tool that plugs in to a 120V recpt that would draw more Amps than a hot tub and they are all GFCI protected.

  10. #10
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,428

    Default

    I'm guessing here, but I would guess a brush type motor where the brushes are getting old (and maybe not!) might give an AFCI a workout. If you've ever looking through the cooling vents, it's likely you could see all sorts of sparks occuring. It probably wouldn't unbalance a GFCI, but might an AFCI. Don't have any AFCI in my (older) place, so can't experiment without costs, and I'm not up for that at the moment.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  11. #11
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Land of Cheese
    Posts
    3,154

    Default

    I run my shop-vac, drills, saws, etc., on an AFCI circuit all the time.

    It has never tripped. Yet.

  12. #12
    Electrician ActionDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    328

    Default

    I have had no trouble with motors in power tools tripping an AFCI. I have had problems with electronics making them trip, more specifically tools that have a soft start.

Similar Threads

  1. AFCI Questions
    By romumok in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 01-18-2012, 05:41 PM
  2. Extension cord for treadmill, ok?
    By mrmichaeljmoore in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 02-11-2009, 03:42 AM
  3. AFCI Circuit trips when I turn on lights
    By Keith Wolf Ent in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 06-23-2008, 08:15 AM
  4. Don't use extension cord for freezer?
    By SD44 in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-18-2008, 05:09 PM
  5. AFCI Vs. GFCI
    By Verdeboy in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-08-2007, 04:18 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •