(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: 4 Wire Cooktop and Oven to 3 Wire Sub Panel

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member TJanak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South TX
    Posts
    152

    Default 4 Wire Cooktop and Oven to 3 Wire Sub Panel

    I have a sub panel that runs all household circuits other than HVAC. It is three wire, i.e. all neutrals and grounds bonded in subpanel. (not ideal, I know).

    I am installing a new electric cooktop and oven and need to purchase wire. These are 4 wire appliances. Do I get 2+G wire or 3+G wire? The old range had 2+G wire with bare ground. Seems to me the bare ground would not be cool.

    The manufacturer lists both 3 and 4 wire connections.



    Btw, the cooktop calls for a 50 amp circuit. 8 or 6 awg?
    Travis

    When I need a precise measurement of something I often use the highly technical method of eyeballing it.

  2. #2
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    Do they cord and plug or are they hard wired?

    Copper or aluminum

    If connecting cooking appliances to a three wire the conductors must land in the service not in the remote panel

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member TJanak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South TX
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Hard wired and copper.

    I can connect them to a four wire that runs to the sub panel

    Seriously though, are my options to run dedicated circuits for the cooktop and oven 90' to the service entrance or get a whole new sub panel and run new 2-3G from the service to the sub?

    I understand the reason for neutral and ground to only be bonded in the service entrance but neither of the two options I see are very practical.
    Travis

    When I need a precise measurement of something I often use the highly technical method of eyeballing it.

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member Chad Schloss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    327

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TJanak View Post
    Hard wired and copper.

    I can connect them to a four wire that runs to the sub panel

    Seriously though, are my options to run dedicated circuits for the cooktop and oven 90' to the service entrance or get a whole new sub panel and run new 2-3G from the service to the sub?

    I understand the reason for neutral and ground to only be bonded in the service entrance but neither of the two options I see are very practical.
    here is a thread you asked the same stuff in from 2009.

    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/arch...p/t-33514.html

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member Chad Schloss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    327

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post
    Do they cord and plug or are they hard wired?

    Copper or aluminum

    If connecting cooking appliances to a three wire the conductors must land in the service not in the remote panel

    jw, what do you do in his situation (in his old thread i posted) where he has his main breaker outside and the panel inside is now considered the sub panel? would this not be allowed?

    copy of the post

    "For what it's worth, yesterday I looked at my parents house which was built in 1988 or so. It is set up exactly like my house except my meter and main panel are on the house. They have one main panel on the meter pole and the sub in the house is wired the exact same way mine is, even including the dryer."

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member TJanak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South TX
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Chad, I know I had that old post from 2009 but I wanted JW's opinion.

    Besides, I didn't really come to a conclusion from that post because of this:

    Exception: For existing branch-circuit installations only where an equipment grounding conductor is not present in the outlet or junction box, the frames of electric ranges, wall-mounted ovens, counter-mounted cooking units,clothes dryers, and outlet or junction boxes that are part of the circuit for these appliances shall be permitted to be connected to the grounded circuit conductor if all the following conditions are met.

    (1) The supply circuit is 120/240-volt, single-phase,3-wire: or 208y/120-volt derived from a 3-phase,4-wire, wye-connected system.

    (2) The grounded conductor is not smaller than 10 AWG copper or 8 AWG aluminum.

    (3) The grounded conductor is insulated, or the grounded conductor is uninsulated and part or a Type SE service-entrance cable and the branch circuit originates at the service equipment.

    (4) Grounding contacts of receptacles furnished as part of the equipment are bonded to the equipment

    At the time I should have pressed the issue more but the other advice I got at the time was to leave it alone so that is what I did.
    Number 3 above reads to me like it's ok if I use an insulated grounded conductor to my existing sub panel. Or would be considered ok if the existing circuit was wired in this way.
    Last edited by TJanak; 12-28-2011 at 06:08 PM.
    Travis

    When I need a precise measurement of something I often use the highly technical method of eyeballing it.

  7. #7
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TJanak View Post
    Chad, I know I had that old post from 2009 but I wanted JW's opinion.

    Besides, I didn't really come to a conclusion from that post because of this:

    Exception: For existing branch-circuit installations only where an equipment grounding conductor is not present in the outlet or junction box, the frames of electric ranges, wall-mounted ovens, counter-mounted cooking units,clothes dryers, and outlet or junction boxes that are part of the circuit for these appliances shall be permitted to be connected to the grounded circuit conductor if all the following conditions are met.(1) The supply circuit is 120/240-volt, single-phase,3-wire: or 208y/120-volt derived from a 3-phase,4-wire, wye-connected system.

    (2) The grounded conductor is not smaller than 10 AWG copper or 8 AWG aluminum.

    (3) The grounded conductor is insulated, or the grounded conductor is uninsulated and part or a Type SE service-entrance cable and the branch circuit originates at the service equipment.

    (4) Grounding contacts of receptacles furnished as part of the equipment are bonded to the equipment

    At the time I should have pressed the issue more but the other advice I got at the time was to leave it alone so that is what I did.
    Number 3 above reads to me like it's ok if I use an insulated grounded conductor to my existing sub panel. Or would be considered ok if the existing circuit was wired in this way.
    I highlighted in red the part of the exception that counts. We can't just pick one of them we must comply with ALL of rhwm

  8. #8
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,645

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TJanak View Post
    I have a sub panel that runs all household circuits other than HVAC. It is three wire, i.e. all neutrals and grounds bonded in subpanel. (not ideal, I know).

    I am installing a new electric cooktop and oven and need to purchase wire. These are 4 wire appliances. Do I get 2+G wire or 3+G wire? The old range had 2+G wire with bare ground. Seems to me the bare ground would not be cool.

    The manufacturer lists both 3 and 4 wire connections.

    Btw, the cooktop calls for a 50 amp circuit. 8 or 6 awg?

    3 + G Copper, 8 AWG 75Deg.C Minimum. / or 6 AWG 60Deg.C
    Last edited by DonL; 12-29-2011 at 04:34 AM.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

  9. #9
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    3 + G Copper, 8 AWG 75Deg.C Minimum. / or 6 AWG 60Deg.C
    If the SE cable is installed in insulation or NM is used then we can't use 75 degree so the #8 would be to small

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member TJanak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South TX
    Posts
    152

    Default

    All of the conditions are currently met except for (3) The grounded conductor is insulated...

    I appreciate the help JW.
    Travis

    When I need a precise measurement of something I often use the highly technical method of eyeballing it.

  11. #11
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    If it is a three wire receptacle it must land in the service equipment or you might have problems elsewhere in the house. See this post;
    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...l=1#post326153

  12. #12
    DIY Senior Member TJanak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South TX
    Posts
    152

    Default

    It's not a receptacle but hard wired. I don't see how that makes a difference. Does it?

    Ok, help me understand this:

    Should the equipment grounding conductor be reconnect to the neutral downstream from the service equipment then from the point of the second connection back to the service all equipment grounding conductors are at the same potential as the circuit supplying them.

    From my point of second connection (sub panel) back to the service is a 3 wire #2 NM type cable. 3rd wire not insulated. I understand this 3rd wire would be carrying current.
    Does this mean all grounding conductors after the point of second connection are at potential as well?
    Travis

    When I need a precise measurement of something I often use the highly technical method of eyeballing it.

Similar Threads

  1. advice on wire gauge for built in oven
    By jono604 in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 91
    Last Post: 12-15-2011, 11:23 AM
  2. Running wire routes from electrical panel for crawl space cabin?
    By chuck b in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-29-2011, 07:45 AM
  3. Wire gauge for new double-oven?
    By Artie in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-11-2010, 07:51 AM
  4. aluminum supply to sub panel - breaker tripping/wire heating
    By completelyhis in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-11-2010, 11:14 AM
  5. A very strange wire in the control panel (NEED HELP PLEASE)
    By greenbaypackersfan in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-21-2010, 12:18 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •