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Thread: Bad water after new pump install

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    DIY Junior Member rickr's Avatar
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    Default Bad water after new pump install

    Hi, I'm hoping to get some much needed advice. I have a deep well 195' that has been in place since 1991 and producing very good water. A little iron content but nothing that could be tasted in the water. 6 months before I changed my pump the water tested perfect. I have it tested annually and have never had any problems or contamination. Everyone has always commented on how good our water tasted. In the fall the well pump went bad and I replaced it. I pulled it up myself and laid the piping on the ground down the side of the driveway and replaced the pump, then lowered it back down. After I turned things back on I noticed that I was getting some small green moss caught in the faucet screens. I cleaned them out for a couple of days and then all was well. I attribute this to having to lay the pipe on the ground since it is 200' of pipe. All was fine for about 3 to 4 weeks then the kids started commenting that the water tasted and smelled like swamp water. It has progressively gotten worse and I now notice an iron smell in the hot water as well. If the water sits in a container, the smell and taste dissipates. I have been told two things.

    1.) I have a broken bladder in my tank which is causing water contamination and I need to replace the tank. This I wouldn't mind as I'd like to increase the tiny tank size to a larger tank and a higher pressure switch. From a 20/40 to a 40/60. The water pressure used to be good but after putting on an addition, the pressure has dropped off considerably. I have a 5 GPM pump and the well produces 40 GPM.

    2.) I need to shock the well as I contaminated it by running the pump piping on the ground? How else was I to do it? 1 gallon bleech down well and obtain specific instructions for taking care of the electric water heater.

    Which is more likely? Could I have contaminated the well in that short period of time? Any advice is appreciated. Obviously since I do this work myself nobody wants to give you accurate information. I can't blame then I suppose. Thanks

  2. #2
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Yes, the well got contaminated and needs to be shocked. The amount of bleach to use however needs to be calculated based on how many gallons of water the well casing holds. Nothing specific for the water heater but if you have a softener, you should put it on bypass for the duration of the shock treatment but it too needs to be sanitized.

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    DIY Junior Member rickr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    Yes, the well got contaminated and needs to be shocked. The amount of bleach to use however needs to be calculated based on how many gallons of water the well casing holds. Nothing specific for the water heater but if you have a softener, you should put it on bypass for the duration of the shock treatment but it too needs to be sanitized.
    Have I ruined this well as a friend tells me? He said once contaminated I will never get it right again, just controlled? I changed the pump in late September and it started to slowly smell more and more in late October or November.

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    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    There is no knowing how far the bacteria may have migrated into the aquifer so the jury is still out. One shocking method is to recirculate the water back into the well so as not to continually dilute it. That may reach a little further into the aquifer.

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    DIY Junior Member rickr's Avatar
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    So the sooner I shock it the better my chances ?


    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    There is no knowing how far the bacteria may have migrated into the aquifer so the jury is still out. One shocking method is to recirculate the water back into the well so as not to continually dilute it. That may reach a little further into the aquifer.

  6. #6
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    A well should be chlorinated immediately after any kind of down-hole service. It's part of the job.

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