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Thread: Iron problem, well chemistry changing?

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  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Scott_J's Avatar
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    Default Iron problem, well chemistry changing?

    Hello,

    I am having an iron problem that seems to be worsening over time and I'm wondering if anyone can comment on how my well chemistry might be changing and/or other ideas as to what's going on. I've been in the house for 9 years with a standard kenmore water softener (rated to remove iron up to 4 ppm) and have never had any iron staining or other water problems until this summer. We started to notice yellow/reddish discoloration that would ebb and flow (sometimes clearing up completely) so I had the water tested in mid-July. Results were total iron at 0.76 ppm and everything else normal. I decided to replace the water softener on the assumption that it had become iron fouled (it was > 9 years old). That did not solve the problem and it has gotten really bad over the past month. I had another iron test done early November this time prior to the water softener, (Total Iron = 10.922 ppm, Iron-dissovled not detectable). I drained the holding tank and there was a large amount of very red water in the bottom along with some larger particles that would crumble when pinched. The well flow rate at the tank is still good (10 gpm) but the water from the well goes through periods of high turbidity and is not a constant color, sometimes fairly clear and sometimes reddish/orange. I had a guy out from Hague yesterday and they were a bit puzzled by the situation and are returning for more tests tomorrow. The tests they did showed:

    pre-softener
    Iron = 10 ppm (I think he said ferrous and he didn't give me a number for red iron because he didn't understand the results he was getting)
    TDS = 250
    PH 6.7
    Hardness = 12 gpg

    He also said it looked like there was iron bacteria based on slimy film in toilet tank.

    Thanks in advance for any advice!

  2. #2
    In the Trades Akpsdvan's Avatar
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    Wells can change, some times in weeks other times over months.

    Any number of reasons for the change, more water use in the area by other new homes.
    There could have been an Earth Quake that has changed the ground formation some place that feeds your water table.
    There could have been a large run off or a lack of a run off that is now effecting your water table...

    Some thing to try for now to see how it works is to set the hardness setting to 53 or just above and cycle the system a few times back to back.

  3. #3
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    Until you can get consistent water chemistry it is going to be difficult to make equipment selections or settings. You might want to take weekly iron and hardness tests for about a month and see if it settles down.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member Scott_J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Sawyer View Post
    Until you can get consistent water chemistry it is going to be difficult to make equipment selections or settings. You might want to take weekly iron and hardness tests for about a month and see if it settles down.
    That's what I was thinking, right now it's a moving target and I don't want to invest in something that won't be appropriate for the long term. I'm just wondering why the sudden change? There was an unusual (for this area) Earthquake back in August at 5.8 near Richmond which shook this area but the problem started prior to that. Rainfall and water table levels are within normal seasonal averages. I'm worried that the well itself is somehow compromised and I'll need to have a new bore hole drilled.

  5. #5
    In the Trades Akpsdvan's Avatar
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    With in normal seasonal averages for how long?

    As I like to ask...
    What is normal?

    I have had well drillers in my area tell of water tables that are like a bowl and others that are like a stream.. so while little may have changed within 5 miles of you, there could have been some changes 50 miles away that are having an effect on your well.

    Testing the untreated water more often is a very good idea and changing the settings on the system as needed would be a great idea.

  6. #6
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Drilling a new well has no guarantee of getting better water quality.

    IRB can cause this. I'd shock the well with FDA approved chlorine pellets at about a 1/2 lb per 100' of water in the well. And dissolve the pellets as best I could in 5 gal buckets before pouring them down the well. I would run a garden hose down the well for 30-45 minutes to get chlorine circulating throughout the column of water in the well and then shut off the hose and take it out of the well.

    Then by pass the softener and all filters or remove any cartridges and run chlorinated water to all cold water fixtures in the house (smelling a glass of water for chlorine at each) and flush each toilet. Then run hot water for 1-2 minutes to get chlorine in the water heater but not until it comes out the faucets.

    Do not allow any water use until you start running off the well continuously and then minimally due to the strength of the chlorine burning eyes and such. You can fill tubs for flushing toilets and go out to eat and without a shower or bath for a day or three. This will bleach fabrics/clothes.

    Then 30-60 minutes after shutting off the hose I would rinse the casing down very well with say 30 gallons of fresh water I previously stored at the well in buckets etc.. Chlorine corrodes steel casing real quick.

    Then every 30 minutes I would run off the chlorine for 5-10 minutes and repeat that as often as possible for as long as possible but at least do it 5-6 times. Then let it sit overnight and turn on the hose to run where chlorine and rust won't harm anything or dig the yard up and let it run continuous adjusting the hose flow so the pump doesn't run dry until the chlorine smell is gone.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
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