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Thread: Producing a well with gas

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    Default Producing a well with gas

    We recently drilled a well that produces a lot of gas. In fact the sub pump gas locks immediately.

    Has anyone had experience preceding a well with gas like this?

    What pump works? I was thinking about the helical Grundfos SQ Flex.

    Would it work to run a packer down with 1” galvanized and let the gas push the water up?

    This is a stock well and about 3-5 gpm would be ideal. The well could be allowed to run year around to avoid freezing if need be.

    Any suggestions?
    rshackleford

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    Hey Shack,

    Will this gas burn? If so the heck with the water.

    bob...

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    No the gas will not burn. I was relieved that it wouldn’t burn, but the customer shares your opinion.
    rshackleford

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    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    No one has ever had experience with this!! I need some help here guys.
    rshackleford

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    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    What kind of gas doesn't burn?

    And if the "gas" locks up the pump, I have no idea how you'd remove the gas in the well. And I guess no one else does either. Sorry.

    I might test that pump to know it's good or try another.

    Gary
    Quality Water Associates

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    Is there that much gas (air) that is makes the pump lose it's prime?


    bob...

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    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    We installed a submersible. We sell about 2 jet pumps a year and they are booster pumps on flowing wells. The submersible would pump about ten gallons and then stop. After a few minutes it would pump a few gallons and stop. This would go on and on. The static is way up there and there was no measurable drawdown.

    We have tried a couple of gas separators in other well, but with no success. I have though a little about the Grundfos SQ Flex pump. This pump is s helical rather than an impeller pump. I though it might be possible that this pump would handle the gas better.

    So, I am looking for a way to make this well work for the customer.
    rshackleford

  8. #8
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    What is helical in a submersible pump? I'm not a big Grundfos fan, so I have not heard of this design.

    bob...

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    We have not had great luck with the 4” Grundfos subs. The welded stainless impellers seem to fly apart too easily. However, we do have occasions when we need to use their three inch pumps on small diameter wells.

    The Grundfos solar pumps are another story all together. These pumps are pretty awesome. The motors can take just about any voltage you can throw at them. That is right AC/DC motors. 110VAC or 220VAC. If you don’t have enough sun, then hook up a generator and you can catch up. The fluid ends themselves are helical. See the attached link.

    grundfos sq flex

    sq flex picture
    rshackleford

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    I never cared for the Grundfos pump. The stainless impellers don't hold a candle to the plastics they use today. A little grit and they disappear.

    Myers has a nice 3" submersible that actually turns only 3450 rpm's unlike the Grundfos that turns 10,000.

    bob...

  11. #11
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    We only sell the little Grundfos. I agree with you the stainless impellers.

    I doubt that we will ever sell anything but Grundfos and Goulds. We have good working relationships with the wholesalers. The Goulds pumps have worked well for us for years. I don’t know what else to say.

    This pump is different, though. It has not impellers, just a helical rod. That’s why I though it might do better with the gas.
    rshackleford

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    I would like to see a close up of the design. It sounds like a worm pump for pumping concrete, but I doubt it is.

    bob...

  13. #13
    DIY Senior Member rshackleford's Avatar
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    The link that I posted is the only pictures I have of it. If you have Photoshop or something like it you should be able to zoom in on it.
    rshackleford

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    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Default Progressing Cavity Pump

    The pump looks like a Progressing Cavity Pump, which was originated by Moyno. It is a positive displacement pump that can develop high pressure with low flow. The stainless shaft is usually running in a rubber cavity.

    http://www.moyno.com/website/

    They are sometimes used for low flow reverse osmosis systems where high pressure is required.

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    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Default Check Valve?

    Presumably the gas is dissolved in the water and escapes when the pressure is reduced at the inlet of the impeller, or even as the water passes the motor of the pump. I have never seen NPSH curves for submersible pumps. It might help to set the pump as far as possible below the static level.

    This might be a case for taking the check valve out of the pump so the gas can escape to the top of the pipe more easily. If it is a stock pump discharging to an open tank, is it possible to get rid of the check valve altogether? That would eliminate the initial head that the pump must start against and let the gas float to the top when the pump is off, and would let any gas easily escape when the pump starts.

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