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Thread: How to go from 1/2" copper to 1/4" compression fitting, with a ball valve inbetween

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Studly's Avatar
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    Default How to go from 1/2" copper to 1/4" compression fitting, with a ball valve inbetween

    To hook up my furnace humidifier, I want to put in a T (sweat connection) in my 3/4" copper pipe that comes out of my water heater, so it comes out to a 1/2" on the side, which will eventually hook up to the 1/4" compression fitting that joins my flexible copper tubing to the humidifier.

    I definitely want to put in a ball valve straight stop in between the 1/2" copper and 1/4" compression fitting.

    What's the easiest way to do this? I went to 2 Home Depot stores and they both pieced together about $20 worth of fittings, going from 1/2" copper to threaded fittings to compression.

    In other forums, they recommended going with a 5/8" compression x 1/4 compression straight ball valve, which is a great idea, but I can't find that in any stores here in suburban Minneapolis.

    Can someone recommend the easiest and best way to do this, with parts I can easily find? Thanks much for your recommendations!
    Last edited by Studly; 11-02-2011 at 06:34 PM.

  2. #2
    In the Trades Jerome2877's Avatar
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    You could use a 1/2" x 3/8" 1/4 turn ball valve and run 3/8 to the unit and then use a 3/8" x 1/4" brass reducing coupling where it connects to the unit.

  3. #3
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Use a 5$ saddle valve for humidifiers [!] and coolers and you'll be done in a half hour.

    At least for a fridge, its best to shut off the water and DRILL a proper size hole for good flow. The self piercing is doable for a humidifier, but drilling is always best.

    Plumbers like to say they are a hack and dangerous, but done right and left exposed are great tools.


    http://www.filtersfast.com/P-Aprilai...FSYaQgodRlkdPw

    http://www.idealtruevalue.com/servlet/the-12936/Detail


    http://www.google.com/products/catal...d=0CHQQ8wIwBw#

    This is an application that really does not require a ballvalve.

    You must have hit the wrong forums. After many years in HVAC, thats what they do for humidifiers. and a good reason not to shop at home depression stores.
    Last edited by ballvalve; 11-03-2011 at 01:16 AM.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote; Use a 5$ saddle valve for humidifiers [!] and coolers and you'll be done in a half hour.

    REAL GOOD ADVICE!!!! Not. we have been telling people to get RID of their Saddle valves for YEARS, and now you tell them to install one? What is the problem? Just use a 1/2" x 1/4" straight or angle compression valve. ANY device can use a 1/4 turn "ball" valve.
    Last edited by Terry; 11-04-2011 at 11:51 AM.
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  5. #5
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    I find it funny that our water heaters flex pipe seals depend totally upon the same piece of rubber as the saddle valve.

    Yet no plumber would suggest that is a problem.

    Thats not counting the 30 or 40 washers on your flex hoses in the house, the toilets tank donut, and the washing machine hoses..

    Seems like saddle valves get a bad rap for no reason at all, especially if one drills a hole for it.

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member JerryR's Avatar
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    This my ice maker tap off the 3/4" water heater input line. It was installed many years ago. Today I prefer all ball valves. This could easily be replaced with a ball valve one day if had the notion to do so.

    Jerry
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  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member Fubar411's Avatar
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    Default Funny though

    Here in St Louis, you can't have your main shut off be a 1/4 turn ball valve. I heard the justification is that would be too hard on the street connections. But hey, it is only the most important shut off in your house, right?

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote; Here in St Louis, you can't have your main shut off be a 1/4 turn ball valve. I heard the justification is that would be too hard on the street connections

    That is a "stupid" justification, so therefore, someone there owns a gate valve manufacturing company.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  9. #9
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Saddle valves are notorious for being undersized, and flimsy.
    As a plumber in the field, we use shutoffs made for that purpose, not a flimsy saddle valve which will only come back to bite you.

    It's not the rubber that is the issue, it's the valve.

  10. #10
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Here is an interesting one - heavy duty with a 1/2" male fitting for a water heater expansion tank, or a valve. No cheap valve to bite you later.

    Nice quality brass:

    http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/pro...px?sku=4264420

    http://www.google.com/products/catal...d=0CHQQ8wIwBw#

  11. #11
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The gasket in supply lines is NOT clamped to a water line. The clamps are NOT a full circle clamp but just two plates with the copper squeezed between them, and usually deformed by the pressure to tighten the clamp. An entirely DIFFERENT situation than supply line gskets.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  12. #12
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    The only thing different is the quality of the 'rubber' and how long before they fail. Then they ALL leak.

    We might as well add in the packing on every valve as another source of failure.

  13. #13
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Yours is a specious argument. IT ignores the "environment" of the various rubber components. The saddle valve is the ONLY one that depends on the copper tubing NOT distorting, (and probably actually not distorting further), in order to avois a leak.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  14. #14
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
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    saddle valves are against most plumbing codes. Here in Illinois it is spelled out in the code "NO SADDLE VALVES OR FITTINGS" Put in your tee and get a 1/2" compression by 1/4" compression 1/4" turn compression stop. I know the pictures do not show the 1/4" turn valve and one is a sweat by 1/4" compression, but its just to show the proper way to hook up an ice maker, or humidifier.

    As fosaddlele valves the biggest issue is they fail, not as causing a leak but they fail as in not turning off since the needle valvcorrodeses away.



    Last edited by SewerRatz; 11-05-2011 at 09:00 AM.

  15. #15
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Name:  SADDLEi_mk.jpg
Views: 1104
Size:  16.7 KBAt 5 bucks, If the valve is frozen, its a second one for cheap. But the link I gave is a saddle with a female thread for YOUR chosen valve.

    Isnt it odd that the great governments that prohibit saddle valves have a truck full of them in the municipal service van? They aint cutting any mains. Nothing specious about that.

    http://www.coppersaddle.com/

    But this would sure cut into the profit of cutting, draining the lines and adding a tee.
    Last edited by ballvalve; 11-05-2011 at 12:31 PM.

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