(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 92

Thread: advice on wire gauge for built in oven

  1. #16
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    Where do I go to see this information? Even if it did it wouldn’t be much to reset it.

  2. #17
    DIY Junior Member Electromen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post
    Where do I go to see this information? Even if it did it wouldn’t be much to reset it.
    It's just experience. I've never connected a cooktop to a GFCI circuit. I was called in on a new house to trouble shoot someone else's work. That person had the cooktop connected to a GFCI circuit. The ignitor would trip it every time. I installed a new circuit that was not GFCI protected and it's worked ever since.
    Last edited by Electromen; 12-11-2011 at 10:34 AM.
    Electrical Contractor since 1980

  3. #18
    DIY Junior Member Electromen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I wouldn't want it on a GFCI because if it did trip, gas could fill the room. You have to assume that your clients are going to make mistakes.
    Electrical Contractor since 1980

  4. #19
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,652

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Electromen View Post
    Run 10/3 with ground "kleenex®". Most of the new ovens have four wires, 2 hot, neutral and ground. Plan on connecting it in a 4" square, 2 1/8" deep metal junction box with 1/2" knock outs. The 10/3 will bit in a 1/2" romex connector. The oven will come with flexible metal conduit. You'll need to buy a 1/2" flex connector, also call a Greenfield connector. If the oven comes with just three wires, 2 hot and a ground, simply do not use the white neutral, cap it off with a wire nut. However most ship with four wires.

    ed. sorry you cannot use that other word for wire on here. their lawyers told us so.


    I never could get kleenex® to conduct electricity very well, When it is wet it does conduct better.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

  5. #20
    DIY Junior Member Electromen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    I never could get kleenex® to conduct electricity very well, When it is wet it does conduct better.
    LOL that's pretty funny. Dog Gone auto-fil and my use of the Trade Marked ® word for nm-b
    Electrical Contractor since 1980

  6. #21
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,652

    Default

    I can see where a GFCI could be a problem with the HV Arc and that could make one trip.

    A proper Ground may help, But Experience tells the Truth...
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

  7. #22
    In the Trades mtcummins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Hold on... I thought some of the electricians on here were adamant that the GFCI will NOT, under ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, trip unless there is a fault in the appliance? I remember soapbox stands about how every appliance should be on a GFCI (such as a refrigerator) or the whole house will most likely blow up...

    Am I to understand that this is incorrect? Am I to understand that all of my experience that those damn things trip on their own all the time with high draw tools and appliances that are in perfect working order? I'm so confused...

    If I put a cooktop in an island, I'll put the outlet for it first w/o GFI, then put the couple island outlets after that on the same circuit with GFCI. If its just in the regular counter run, I put the cooktop on its own non-protected circuit. I know, I know, I'm pretty much dooming my family to die in a horrible accident...

  8. #23
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    This is nothing more than bull crap. I have been installing gas cook tops on a GFCI protected circuit for more years than I care to talk about and not the first one has tripped. I have without a doubt wired more kitchens than any 10 of you have ever been in.

    Just where in this world do you all come up with this junk?

  9. #24
    DIY Senior Member TJanak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South TX
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Maybe others would like to know which GFCI you are using. Brand, etc.

    I would imagine there is a quality difference between brands.

    My kitchen is down to studs and electrical work is next.
    Travis

    When I need a precise measurement of something I often use the highly technical method of eyeballing it.

  10. #25
    DIY Junior Member Electromen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post
    This is nothing more than bull crap. I have been installing gas cook tops on a GFCI protected circuit for more years than I care to talk about and not the first one has tripped. I have without a doubt wired more kitchens than any 10 of you have ever been in.

    Just where in this world do you all come up with this junk?
    So how many thousands of homes have you wired?
    Electrical Contractor since 1980

  11. #26
    DIY Junior Member Electromen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mtcummins View Post
    Hold on... I thought some of the electricians on here were adamant that the GFCI will NOT, under ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, trip unless there is a fault in the appliance? I remember soapbox stands about how every appliance should be on a GFCI (such as a refrigerator) or the whole house will most likely blow up...

    Am I to understand that this is incorrect? Am I to understand that all of my experience that those damn things trip on their own all the time with high draw tools and appliances that are in perfect working order? I'm so confused...

    If I put a cooktop in an island, I'll put the outlet for it first w/o GFI, then put the couple island outlets after that on the same circuit with GFCI. If its just in the regular counter run, I put the cooktop on its own non-protected circuit. I know, I know, I'm pretty much dooming my family to die in a horrible accident...
    I never connect a refrigerator to a GFCI. It's on it's own dedicated circuit.
    Electrical Contractor since 1980

  12. #27
    In the Trades mtcummins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Electromen View Post
    I never connect a refrigerator to a GFCI. It's on it's own dedicated circuit.
    THANK YOU! Its good to know that some of you sparkies still have some sanity left in you. Maybe its the whole being from Pittsburgh thing :-P

  13. #28
    In the Trades mtcummins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TJanak View Post
    Maybe others would like to know which GFCI you are using. Brand, etc.

    I would imagine there is a quality difference between brands.

    My kitchen is down to studs and electrical work is next.
    I would also like to know what brand you're using.

    I'm always up to learn more/better products, but my experience with numerous GFCIs has been that they randomly trip when subjected to high current draw. Tools in particular seem to love to trip them, but not all the time, and not always the same tools, before you start claiming that the tool is defective (as others have attempted on here). My brand new, professional grade tools and my very old, tried and true tools both do this. If yours are somehow magically better than the ones I'm used to, I'll start using them. But still not on refrigerators, dishwasher/disposals, cooktops, etc.

  14. #29
    DIY Junior Member Electromen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I wire more homes in Westmoreland County than any other electrical contractor. The homes I wire start at $320,000 and go up. I've averaged 60 new homes per year since 1980. I also wire high end kitchens for the largest kitchen cabinet company in the County. I have two teaching degrees in the State of PA., K-12, and Vo-Techs . One is for electrical, Since I have a masters degree, I'm also certified to teach at the Universities. The electrical inspector I use has an electrical engineering degree from Penn State. We talk often and I always pass inspection. I also do commercial and industrial wiring including motor controls and overhead crane repair.
    I'm not bragging, but when someone attacks my knowledge I need to defend myself.
    Last edited by Electromen; 12-11-2011 at 01:40 PM.
    Electrical Contractor since 1980

  15. #30
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    3,652

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Electromen View Post
    I wire more homes in Westmoreland County than any other electrical contractor. The homes I wire start at $320,000 and go up. I've averaged 60 new homes per year since 1980. I also wire high end kitchens for the largest kitchen cabinet company in the County. I have two teaching degrees in the State of PA., K-12, and Vo-Techs . One is for electrical, Since I have a masters degree, I'm also certified to teach at the Universities. The electrical inspector I use has an electrical engineering degree from Penn State. We talk often and I always pass inspection. I also do commercial and industrial wiring including motor controls and overhead crane repair.
    I'm not bragging, but when someone attacks my knowledge I need to defend myself.
    Very Nice Electromen®

    Sounds like You have some good experience under your belt.

    I do know that GFCIs and Appliances , tools or whatever you connect them to operate differently in different applications/situations.

    As far as I can remember GFIs in homes were made to protect people from getting hurt while working in wet or damp environments. Or a dummy that drops the hairdryer in the bathtub. Hard to protect a dummy, no mater how hard you try.

    When GFCIs are put on everything in the House, they can make more problems for the end user.

    If a appliance has a fault normally the GFCI does little to make the appliance or You any safer.
    That is why appliances have built in safety devices. Redundancy is better used in Aircraft.

    When I worked on REAL Ground Fault systems used on 3 phase Oil Drilling Systems, Where you have a Meter actually telling you the amount of Fault Current, I realized the affect of different equipment operating on the same Electrical Source.

    When you have a problem in a system that is drilling, the last thing that you want is for a breaker to trip. That is why they use Alarms, Not Automatic Ground Fault Interrupters.

    If the electrical load is far enough off it will blow the Feeder Fuse.


    Stick in there and teach us all something new.


    I am a old dog that likes to learn new tricks...


    DonL®
    Last edited by DonL; 12-11-2011 at 06:28 PM. Reason: Op Error
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

    Cyber Security Protection for Windows C:\ > WWW.WinForce.Net

Similar Threads

  1. Converting from larger to smaller wire gauge
    By maurice53 in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-21-2011, 12:16 PM
  2. Wire gauge for new double-oven?
    By Artie in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-11-2010, 07:51 AM
  3. wire gauge change mid circuit
    By rockycmt in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-09-2009, 11:29 AM
  4. breaker size for 12 gauge wire
    By whoazone in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-20-2008, 05:02 PM
  5. heavy gauge bare copper wire
    By solutions in forum Electrical Forum discussion & Blog
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-26-2008, 07:11 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •