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Thread: four way valve or best way to get three outlets from one supply?

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Rascal's Avatar
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    Default four way valve or best way to get three outlets from one supply?

    Friends,
    What a great forum. I have been visiting here for years and gotten great answers by searching, most recently with a hair pulling situation with what turned out to be a gerber toilet needing an extra large donut between the tank and toilet. thanks to this great forum I was able to find out I needed an atypical donut before cracking my toilet by "tightening more" as my hardware store recommended.

    1) But this question I don't see a posted answer for: I need some kind of four way valve or better yet best practices for getting three outputs from my sink cold water supply: a) sink faucet plus b) Reverse Osmosis c) refrigerator ice maker.

    I have all my cabinets and sink out, wallboard off and am fixing several imperfect jobs (of my own and prior owners).

    Ideally for the cold I would like at least one main shutoff in case the faucet needs replacement, and then independent shut off for service of the R/O and ice maker.

    I have to get out the propane and copper and extend the cold water supply coming out of the wall as the old cabinet had no back and the valve was jammed agaisnt the wallboard. so I will bring it out about 2" anyway. May as well do what is best practices, nicest looking and most useful with the supply.

    Any ideas to do this nicely, so it works well and a future home inspector will see this as well done?

    would I use one of these to tap to a) faucet and b) R/o and ice-maker, splitting the RO and ice-maker with some kind of Y after with inline cut offs?

    Is there some kind of "4 way" or would that look idiotic or not be available except for special order? ( I want to get this done in 72 hours)

    2) Any recommendation for good carbon/sediment filter dedicated to the ice-maker. I understand it should not drop pressure too much and is mainly to protect ice maker (I have very hard water with lots of sediment)

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by Rascal; 10-25-2011 at 03:48 PM.

  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Use a 1/2x3/8/1/4 three way angle valve, AND a 3/8x1/4 "Add-a-Tee" between the outlet and the faucet supply hose. Then use 1/4" 'push on' valves in the supplies to the icemaker and RO unit.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  3. #3
    Plumber Winslow's Avatar
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    If you are replacing the cabinet then just rough-in three stubbouts on the cold side instead of one, then each fixture will have it's own valve. I usually put 4 stubbouts under a kitchen sink anyway. 1 set of hot and cold for the faucet then another set of hot and cold for the dishwasher and icemaker. That would be the best way to do it IMO.

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member Rascal's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Wow. Both excellent and useful answers. Thanks so much.
    I think I will likely do Winslow's suggestion of two each, I hadn't even thought of that. HJ may not have realized from my long rambling question that I have the wallboard off two feet from the floor.

    Two more more questions about procedures for Winslow's double stub out. What is the most effective way to cap this for a couple of days before I put in cabinet? I'd like to keep the cabinet backboard on and make holes small as possible. I am assuming I would leave an extra couple of inches and solder on a cap so I can get the water on for the rest of the place? I would then only need to cut a hole the size of the cap (I have a fernco on the drain stub at the moment.)

    It has been a couple of years since I soldered copper pipe but I have done it in the past and feel comfortable doing a well prepped and well done job with one exception: the in-wall soldering. The one copper pipe is fixed to the stud. I can remove the copper strap there and probably get a piece of wood to hold it an inch from the stud but no more.

    So I was looking at this instruction:
    finehomebuilding dot com/how-to/departments/building-skills/soldering-copper-pipe.aspx

    I would assemble and solder the main element ( two sets of sleeve to 1/2" pipe to "T" + 6" capped length to 90 +6" capped length) in the back yard. For the two in wall soldering of the premade elements I would add a 1' x 1' "torch blanket" and a handy fire extinguisher for the process. Is that the way the pros do it? Any other fire protection tips?:

  5. #5
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    In my opinion, it is much preferable to rough in multiple stubs, as hj described. In the end, that is a neater look and much more reliable.

    I have certainly used the dual outlet valves, dual valves, and add-a-tees. When all is said and done, you're better off with the "more difficult" route

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member Rascal's Avatar
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    Jimbo. I am sorry. Perhaps I am confused. I thought the multiple stubs was as Winslow, not HJ described?



    I would prebuild two sets of the following

    c -- 7 Cap + 6" of pipe + 90 degree

    .......| 3" Pipe

    c -- -| cap + 6" pipe + "T"

    .......| 2" Pipe

    .......|| Sleeve


    Then:

    a) shut off main water. Drain as much as possible faucets at the level or below
    b) cut existing in wall vertical pipe
    c) clean and deburr pipe inside and out.
    d) Fire riusk reduction: spray and wet studs within 12" of work. place a 1'x1' piece of sheet metal behind it. place a torch blanket (HD has 5"x 10") between work and stud. Have fire extinguisher handy.
    d) flux existing old work and sleeve of the new assembly
    e) solder to good flow and copper brightening. visual inspect
    f) repeat for other fitting
    g) reopen main. test.
    h) secure to studs with shims and copper straps
    h) paper test overnight before sealing wall.

    After cabinet installation:
    a) shut off mains
    b) cut off caps
    c) install 4 compression fitting 1/4 turn stop valves

    Forgive the detail but I am just an amateur and there is a finished floor below, so I want to make sure from the pros I am being methodical and didn't miss anything.
    Last edited by Rascal; 10-26-2011 at 07:37 PM.

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member BobL43's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rascal View Post
    Jimbo. I am sorry. Perhaps I am confused. I thought the multiple stubs was as Winslow, not HJ described?



    I would prebuild two sets of the following

    c -- 7 Cap + 6" of pipe + 90 degree

    .......| 3" Pipe

    c -- -| cap + 6" pipe + "T"

    .......| 2" Pipe

    .......|| Sleeve


    Then:

    a) shut off main water. Drain as much as possible faucets at the level or below
    b) cut existing in wall vertical pipe
    c) clean and deburr pipe inside and out.
    d) Fire riusk reduction: spray and wet studs within 12" of work. place a 1'x1' piece of sheet metal behind it. place a torch blanket (HD has 5"x 10") between work and stud. Have fire extinguisher handy.
    d) flux existing old work and sleeve of the new assembly
    e) solder to good flow and copper brightening. visual inspect
    f) repeat for other fitting
    g) reopen main. test.
    h) secure to studs with shims and copper straps
    h) paper test overnight before sealing wall.

    After cabinet installation:
    a) shut off mains
    b) cut off caps
    c) install 4 compression fitting 1/4 turn stop valves

    Forgive the detail but I am just an amateur and there is a finished floor below, so I want to make sure from the pros I am being methodical and didn't miss anything.
    And I thought it was just my eyes.
    I am definitely not a pro plumber, but I am a pro crastinator

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote; HJ may not have realized from my long rambling question that I have the wallboard off two feet from the floor.

    It would have made no difference, I would still have done it the same way. There is NO functional difference between multiple valves and multiple outlet valves.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  9. #9
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    I hope that neither winslow or hj take offense that I mixed them up! No disrespect to either.

  10. #10
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    seems to me you need a manifold. http://www.pexsupply.com/Copper-Manifolds-1843000

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