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Thread: Leaving the Drywall Short - Baseboard shall cover it

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    Default Leaving the Drywall Short - Baseboard shall cover it

    So ...new checkvalve in the basement. Hopefully, this will the end all - be all to sewer water backup flooding in the basement.
    It's happens once every 6- 8 years...

    10" Wide plant wood flooring is getting ripped out

    Anyhow, after the Finished flooring (tile), how common or not , does someone cut the drywall higher up .....and just let the baseboard cover it. I'm inclined to have the sheetrock cut 3/4 - 1 1/4" cut higher than the finished flooring. This way, it kinda will at least not be a sponge to the water should I ever get water again. I've been smitten by this whole mold/remodel situation.


    Crazy idea of common practice on some parts of the world.

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    DIY Senior Member TJanak's Avatar
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    Baseboard that I have used is not flat on the backside, but milled out to be thinner in the middle section. So looking at the profile of the baseboard you have only about 1/2" of flat surface at the bottom and top of the baseboard that would touch the drywall. When the drywall is cut up too high, the baseboard does not sit parallel to the wall, but rather the bottom gets sucked under the drywall when nailed. When I've had drywall cut up too high I've actually had to cut strips of wood that are 1/2" think and slide them under the drywall so the bottom of the baseboard is up against the wood strip and the baseboard sits straight.
    Travis

    When I need a precise measurement of something I often use the highly technical method of eyeballing it.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The taper on the edge of most drywall is often nearly the height of common baseboard. Did you know that the paper on drywall has grain to it? It should be installed horizontally, not vertically, for maximum strength. This puts one big seam about mid-way up the wall (and the long edges). That's one reason why they make 12' sheets, but they're a really big pain to move around (best left to the pros with the right tools) - they minimize those harder to conceal edges after taping.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Plumbing Contractor for 49 years johnjh2o1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    The taper on the edge of most drywall is often nearly the height of common baseboard. Did you know that the paper on drywall has grain to it? It should be installed horizontally, not vertically, for maximum strength. This puts one big seam about mid-way up the wall (and the long edges). That's one reason why they make 12' sheets, but they're a really big pain to move around (best left to the pros with the right tools) - they minimize those harder to conceal edges after taping.
    That may be one reason to install it horizontally but the main reason is to make it easier to tape. It puts the joint 4" off the floor with 8' ceilings. If it was hung vertically half the joint would have to be done on stilts then remove the stilts to do the lower half.

    John

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    DIY Senior Member BobL43's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnjh2o1 View Post
    That may be one reason to install it horizontally but the main reason is to make it easier to tape. It puts the joint 4" off the floor with 8' ceilings. If it was hung vertically half the joint would have to be done on stilts then remove the stilts to do the lower half.

    John
    I think Jim kinda said that somewhere in his post. you mean the joint is 4 feet off the floor, right?
    I am definitely not a pro plumber, but I am a pro crastinator

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    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    BTW, I'm going to have to take a rasp or knive and create a nice deepish bevel on the rock that is still hanging on the wall - to minimize the bump down the middle when I tape back. Grrr..just more dust to vac.

    I'm a stickler for flat and level. Corner beads I prefer all metal, but you need to skim quit a bid to make the level plane.

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member BobL43's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefwong View Post
    BTW, I'm going to have to take a rasp or knive and create a nice deepish bevel on the rock that is still hanging on the wall - to minimize the bump down the middle when I tape back. Grrr..just more dust to vac.

    I'm a stickler for flat and level. Corner beads I prefer all metal, but you need to skim quit a bid to make the level plane.
    that's why they make 62 pound buckets of drywall compound. What a friggin' mess sheetrocking and spackling is. Just went though a room myself.
    I am definitely not a pro plumber, but I am a pro crastinator

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    Ha. It get's better with age.
    When I 1st did it , it was all JC.
    You get wise, make the 1st bed with hot mud and the second coat with hot mud and then the final coats if not skim coat with JC.....and the more you tape.....the more you learn how to mud and minimize sanding. Investing in a Hepa vac setup with vac sander helps too. I hate it as much as painting.
    Last edited by chefwong; 10-24-2011 at 08:21 PM.

  9. #9

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    I would cut it short and use a drylock on the walls nearer the bottom. If you are framing in the bottom, for support and for the baseboard, I would use a little tar, too, nearer the floor and the wood frame. Green board might be not a bad idea, either. I just ripped out a complete workshop area where mold was everywhere, behind the cabinets, behind the peg board ( which in one spot was placed nearer the floor and sucked up the water).

    If you need to in the future, fix those walls, ripping off the baseboard, and using bleach & water, then, drylock is alot easier if you don't have to remove some drywall first which might be then, moldy.

    The only reason I suggested using a little tar was because when I ripped this out, I noticed that the part of the wooden framing which had some tar on it, didn't rotten like the wood, my husband didn't use it on. Maybe, it worked, or maybe it was a fluke.
    Quote Originally Posted by chefwong View Post
    So ...new checkvalve in the basement. Hopefully, this will the end all - be all to sewer water backup flooding in the basement.
    It's happens once every 6- 8 years...

    10" Wide plant wood flooring is getting ripped out

    Anyhow, after the Finished flooring (tile), how common or not , does someone cut the drywall higher up .....and just let the baseboard cover it. I'm inclined to have the sheetrock cut 3/4 - 1 1/4" cut higher than the finished flooring. This way, it kinda will at least not be a sponge to the water should I ever get water again. I've been smitten by this whole mold/remodel situation.


    Crazy idea of common practice on some parts of the world.
    Last edited by Cookie; 10-25-2011 at 07:42 AM.

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member chefwong's Avatar
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    Picked up a sample of denshield.
    Water test seems fine...doesn't soak up like a sponge.


    The labor is all the same at the end of the day......but the denshield will require at least 2 skimcoats to get that Level 5 finish.....

  11. #11
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Hey Chef.

    Check out this drywall detail!

    No Schluter Profiles on this job....

    On this project today we needed to fix the tile baseboard tight to the wall. Not pre-filling the tapered seams can cause your tile or wood baseboard to fall inwards.

    Here you can see some fine detail we used on the tile edges to make them a little nicer.





    Last edited by johnfrwhipple; 10-22-2013 at 09:25 PM.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  12. #12
    DIY Senior Member guy48065's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnfrwhipple View Post
    Hey Chef.

    Check out this drywall detail!

    No Schluter Profiles on this job....
    God will it ever end...
    Romeo and Atlanta, MI

  13. #13
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Yeah, he had to dig up a 2-year old thread to throw some more darts at...
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  14. #14
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Default Should the drywall be left short in your bathroom Build?

    It's best not to leave the drywall short if it is not supported. The main reason for this is to make sure that the drywall is fully supported at the bottom with the bottom plate. If you are planning to leave it a couple inches shy you loose this support. Best to drop in some extra blocking for support then.

    Clearly Jim has no clue what he is talking about here. Some things you can not learn reading other men's posts. Jim is an expert from solar panels to microwaves - just ask him.



    When installing your tile you need to make sure the tile is not set tight to the drywall. Notice in this picture we have installed silicone around the perimeter of the tile. This keeps out little bugs that might want to move in and offers up a little compression when the floor want to heat up. These are two by two tiles. Our bathroom floors need to move.

    I wrote a story about this for Houzz.
    This bathroom has Ditra below the tile and floor heat. Had Strata Mat be available when I built this I would have used it in lue of the Ditra. Any BAthroom that is no a barrier free is better served with Laticrete's Strata Mat.
    Last edited by johnfrwhipple; 10-23-2013 at 06:33 AM.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  15. #15
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Default Leaving the drywall short - tile baseboard - flush with drywall



    This is the great profile I'm talking about . No ugly Schluter Profile. Clean contemporary lines. No wood baseboard.

    Not to hard to achieve.

    I show the process pictures here on this discussion.

    Tile to Wall Transitions - A seamless Look


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

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