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Thread: Should hospitals and doctors have this right?

  1. #1

    Default Should hospitals and doctors have this right?


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    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    Yeah, but come on this whole things smacks of the "American way" when it comes to health.

    And I quote: "While in the U.S. hospital, the boy was given a tracheotomy to allow easier breathing and sent back to his home in Windsor, Canada"

    To an outsider, this means that if you turn up at a US hospital uninsured, they will stabilize you but not treat you.

    And it sucks.

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member BobL43's Avatar
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    Default Really?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Gills View Post
    Yeah, but come on this whole things smacks of the "American way" when it comes to health.

    And I quote: "While in the U.S. hospital, the boy was given a tracheotomy to allow easier breathing and sent back to his home in Windsor, Canada"

    To an outsider, this means that if you turn up at a US hospital uninsured, they will stabilize you but not treat you.

    And it sucks.
    To me, it sounds like the docs in Canada said "he's going to die anyway, why bother to waste our time and money to comfort him"
    I am definitely not a pro plumber, but I am a pro crastinator

  4. #4

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    Exactly, Bob.
    That is messed up.

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    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    To me it sounds like the American hospital just stuck a tube in and thought "not our problem".

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    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Gills View Post
    ... this whole things smacks of the "American way" when it comes to health.

    And I quote: "While in the U.S. hospital, the boy was given a tracheotomy to allow easier breathing and sent back to his home in Windsor, Canada."

    To an outsider, this means that if you turn up at a US hospital uninsured, they will stabilize you but not treat you.

    And it sucks.
    That is some of my own experience. Over several months, my BP had steadily risen to 250/140 last December, and I dialed 911 and was transported to an ER and then spent two days being stabilized in an ICU ... and then they moved me to a regular room and stopped checking my vital signs altogether so they could send me back home without ever getting to the root of my problem three days after that. Fortunately, however, I know of a sympathetic doctor who is willing to prescribe the extra BP medication I need as long as I pay him cash since he does not accept Medicaid patients at all.

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    DIY Senior Member LOTW's Avatar
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    Fortunately, however, I know of a sympathetic doctor who is willing to prescribe the extra BP medication I need as long as I pay him cash since he does not accept Medicaid patients at all
    My view is that if a doctor wants to be trained at public institutions (many), have admitting priviledges at a tax exempt hospital (most), or want to receive insurance payments from a plan which qualifies for tax deductability under IRS regulations (even more), he/she should be required to accept medicare and medicaid. And it is reaching the point where the cost of medical services will need to be tied to the medicare reimbursement rate if the cost of health care can be contained

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    DIY Senior Member BobL43's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LOTW View Post
    My view is that if a doctor wants to be trained at public institutions (many), have admitting priviledges at a tax exempt hospital (most), or want to receive insurance payments from a plan which qualifies for tax deductability under IRS regulations (even more), he/she should be required to accept medicare and medicaid. And it is reaching the point where the cost of medical services will need to be tied to the medicare reimbursement rate if the cost of health care can be contained
    Exactly, I agree, and I have not had any problems so far
    I am definitely not a pro plumber, but I am a pro crastinator

  9. #9

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    All it takes too is a phone call, asking if they accept.

  10. #10
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    All it takes is a phone call?

    When your BP is 250/140?

    Come on. People don't have time to be calling around when they are sick.

    Not in the other developed countries anyway.

  11. #11

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    I know people on Medicaid. There are those doctors and clinics, like Med Express, that do take it. Infact, come to think of it, my own oncologist takes it. So, you find in advance a doctor that you go to for check ups.

    Now, if something happens, where it is an emergency, heck yeah, go to the ER. I know a plumber who had a heart attack, he didn't have insurance, while out and about on a job, he didn't feel right, and he took a Bayer ( in his work truck) drove himself to the ER, and in the ER he had a "widow-maker" heart attack and literally, flat-lined. They did CPR, brought back a heart beat and rushed him to the OR. They put a stent in, fixed him up, he was in the hospital for sometime. Today, he is on meds. He is doing fine. He is back to plumbing and being my best buddy.
    Last edited by Cookie; 10-01-2011 at 09:56 AM.

  12. #12

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    You don't wait til something happens. Find a doctor, a place, a clinic, whatever which accepts your insurance whatever it is, and get regular check ups, making sure they are taking your Blood Pressure.

    So, yes, Ian, all it takes is a phone call.

  13. #13

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    Lee, call around and find a doctor near you, who accepts Medicaid. This doctor should had recommended to you, other doctors who do, at least his office staff could provide you with some numbers, or even the hospital upon discharge. If they don't, then, I would get a family member if I didn't feel well, to do the calling for me. I wouldn't be paying for meds out of my own pocket, unless, I had to. Plus, you shouldn't be paying for office visits either, maybe, just your copay, which most everyone has to do, so, if you find a doctor who accepts it, it would be to your benefit. Because of my husband's death, and the military, I am able to use Medicare, and I pay extra for an insurance which closes the gap, and provides me with a Prescription plan. I was paying after he died, losing his insurance, 830.00 a month, because of pre-existing conditions, but, since I did this, I pay 152.00 a month, which is decent.

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Using that boy is not a good example. He had a fatal, incurable disease. What COULD any hospital do to save his life? Nothing. The US hospital did a procedure that alledgedly eased his breathing temporarily. IF that was very appropriate, we can criticize the Canadian hospital for not doing that to ease his paiin. Maybe a stiff shot of Michael Jackson's propophol would have been better.

    Much as we don't like to talk about it....if the jig is up...it's UP.

  15. #15

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    Jim, you're right. They should had eased his pain by doing that procedure. Just the plain truth.

    What's your wife think on this one Jim? ( i bet she agrees)

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