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Thread: New Setup installed today and still want more pressure... Myer HJ75D

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member larryruest's Avatar
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    Question New Setup installed today and still want more pressure... Myer HJ75D

    Hi, Finally found a kick*** forum about what I had researched for weeks...I had upgraded today from a 1/2 hp 30 year old twin type deep well jetpump / an old steal tank to a myers hj75D deep well jet pump and a fiberglass 30 gallon air pressure tank...

    First of all in the myers jetpump instruction it was only talking about 20 - 40 psi / 30 - 50 psi setup... I want the most pressure possible since I have a house with three levels and the main bathroom is on level 3... On level 3 there is not a lot of pressure but on ground 0 (basement) there is a lot of pressure... Piping is a factor here since I have copper pipes which are really small and a lot of 90 degrees....

    So I wanted to go with the 40 - 60 psi setup (screw myers handbook)

    So I inflated the tank to 36 PSI as recommended in the tank handbook.

    I hooked that all up and the pressure was set to 20 - 40 on the pump. So I played with the screws and now it is set to 34 - 58.... I tried to put it around 60 or 61 but the pump runs a lot of time before getting to 60... Is that normal?

    Also the screw on the regulator, I tighted it too much and there was no water coming out at all fom the sink... How can I set this up? Is that a factor on how much pressure I can get?

    What is the average time a pump should run between cycle? My pump if it is running and there is water continuously flowing, it looks like it would never stop...

    Also the gauge when the pump run is oscilating and is not steady like the gauge i' ve seen online...


    Would you have any recommendation? If I could raise it higher than 60 PSI, I would be really happy since the presure upstaires will make sense.....

  2. #2
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    First off, let some air out of the bladder. It is overinflated if you cannot set the kick-in to 40 PSI. There is nothing wrong with the pump running continuously while you're using water. You just need to find the sweet spot which will depend on what depth the jet has to push the water up from.

    Draw water off at the same rate the pump is putting out at a specific pressure and calculate the GPM. Then reduce the flow so that the pump levels out at a higher pressure and measure the GPM again. Do that a few more times, reducing the flow each time and you will have plotted a curve. That curve will tell you how high you can take the pressure.

    Why did you not go with a submersible? They are twice as efficient and capable of much more pressure.

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    DIY Junior Member larryruest's Avatar
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    Hi LLigetfa, I could try setting up the kick in to 40 PSI, I would just need to turn the bigger screw a bit there, right? I could that,... its just the pump it takes a lot of time to pump from like 50to 60 psi and I don't think I can go any a lot further than 60... How come? It Might do it but would take a long long time I tought upgrading my system would let me have higher pressure...

    A quick question, why would the bladder be overinflated when in the guide it told me to put 36 PSI if the pump would pump from 40 to 60 psi?

    I bought the house and it was not a submersible pump... This is the main reason I had put another same kind of pump there...

  4. #4
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    36 PSI would be OK if you could get the kick-in up to 40 but you said that you did not and you complained about the gauge not being steady.

    Tightening the nut on the big spring not only raises the kick-in but also raises the kick-out. If your pressure switch also has a second smaller spring, tightening it raises only the kick-out. Even if you loosen the small spring, you can only reduce the spread so far.

    The max pressure you can get depends on what depth you are pushing the water from. Upgrading from a 1/2 HP to a 3/4 HP is not much of an increase in GPM. Upgrading to 1 HP would give you just a little bit more. If your casing is large enough to take a submersible, that would be the way to go.

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    DIY Junior Member larryruest's Avatar
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    Allright I will try that to raise it at 40 at least..... How can I know if my pressure regulator screw is thigten enough? Would that be of any impact?

    Looks like the pump is pumping 2 minutes when it starts and no water is running... takes more thanthat when water is running, are these good time?

  6. #6
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    At 40/60 the drawdown on your 30 gallon tank would be less than 8 gallons so if it takes the pump 2 minutes to cycle with no water use, you are getting less than 4 GPM from the pump. That pump drawing from a depth of 30 feet should be able to produce much more than that so you must be pushing up from a greater depth. You still have not told us anything about the well so how can we do anthing but guess?

  7. #7
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    The way a jet pump works is the pump uses pressure to build volume and the pressure you see starts at the jet in the well. That is why it's so important to know how high it pushes the water. The weight of water takes away about 4.3 PSI for every 10 feet. That is why you notice poor pressure on the third floor. The greater depth the pump has to push from the less pressure (PSI) and volume (GPM) it can produce.

  8. #8
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    If your water level is anywhere close to 80', that pump is not capable of building 60 PSI. A house with three floors really needs about 50/70 on the pressure switch. A good submersible would make a world of difference.

  9. #9
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Also, depending on the recovery rate of the well or fluctuating static levels, you just might eek out 60 PSI today but when the level drops, you will boil water in the pump when it cannot reach the shutoff PSI.

  10. #10
    Porky Cutter,MGWC Porky's Avatar
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    LLigetfa probably said it best. Pumps don't build pressure the jet in the well builds the pressure. Because the amount of lift, the pressure developed depends on the amount of lift, hence 4.3 psi is lost for every 10 ft. it has to push or lift. Jet pump systems are quite limited to the amount of pressure they can supply.

    If you have a 4" or larger well I would suggest that you install a submersible pump in the well. They require less horsepower, produce more water and gpm pluss they are self priming. they are simple to install. However if you don't have a 4" or larger well this is not an option.

    In either case I would install a Cycle Stop Valve between the pump and tank. It will give you a constant pressure while providing a variable flow. You will love it in the shower as well as the rest of the system. Go to www.cyclestopvalves.com for more information.
    Porky Cutter, MGWC
    (Master Ground Water Consultant)

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    DIY Junior Member larryruest's Avatar
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    Hi, the old system was installed before I bought the house... I have no clue on how deep the well is. The only thing I know is there is two pipes coming in the house... I tought replacing the pump would be the best solution...

    Looks like this is the best I can get for now right?

  12. #12
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    So then, you didn't pull the jet assembly from the well and change it or even clean it? Did you get a jet assembly with the new pump? What size is your casing? Is it a packer ejector or are there two pipes going down the casing? If so, you could drop in a submersible. That would make a world of difference.

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