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Thread: Americans are rude

  1. #1
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    Default Americans are rude

    In actual fact you are not rude at all.

    But foreigners often think Americans are.

    After six years of living here I have come to the conclusion as why.

    It's a language issue.

    If I am on a crowded train or a bus in England and I need to squeeze past you, I would say something like the following:

    "Excuse me, please". "Thank you".

    Or,

    "Sorry." "Thank you".

    In America, the equivalent is:

    "Excuse me."

    No please. No thank you.

    And that is why some people think Americans are rude.

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    If you avoid trains and buses, you won't have that problem.

    This is why god invented cars and freeways.

  3. #3
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Other areas of the world, they just push you out of the way, without any conversation at all.

  4. #4
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    Is a little please and thank you too much to ask?

    And why no sorries? You very rarely here anyone say they are sorry here.

  5. #5

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    Ha, that is funny, that is what Americans think of people from other countries, touché.

    How odd, I was just thinking, and counting myself, and others I know, there isn't anyone I know who would had posted a thread like you just did about us, about another people or country; especially even while living in it. Sometimes thoughts like that is best kept to yourself, if that is what you think, it serves no purpose. That... was rude. But like I said above... that is what Americans think of other people from other countries.
    Last edited by Cookie; 02-19-2011 at 03:26 PM.

  6. #6
    In the Trades Jerome2877's Avatar
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    Ian is correct, its a language issue. I used to work with americans on the phone alot, and its the little things like when you say thank you here people reply your welcome, many americans say uh huh, or yep. The intent is there but it can come across as rude to someone not used to this.

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    I'm from Canada, and I say "thank you" as long as the person in my path isn't American or British...

  8. #8

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    I say thank you when the person is deserving.

    How funny, I used to teach handicap kids. The needs are great for kids with certain disabilities who cannot communicate, whose skills are slim to none. I would teach signing and fingerspelling. I was more concerned that the kids learned skills to make others aware of their needs, ie, they are in pain, they need a drink, ( if not using a feeding tube) or needed to go to the bathroom, or any other needs in order to make them live easier. It is a very difficult job to teach one sign, and required many many hours of work.

    How funny, it was when I found a parent or nurse whose main complaint was that I didn't teach them the monkey signs first, such as, for one, thank you. Here we got a kid or kids who needed so much and they wanted them to make sure they seemed polite. I found it sad and disgusted me, and at times, when I was pressured to teach that one sign first, over... others, so much more important.

    I don't listen for that word of thank you from anyone, I look for it in actions instead. It is far more important and far less petty.

  9. #9
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    The older I get the more I realise that relationships matter.

    So spoken pleasantries are important.

    Yes, actions speak louder than words but where I live we often just don't have the time.

    But if you want to give little bows and curtseys everytime you want to thank someone then please go ahead.

    I'll stick to the spoken word.

  10. #10

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    Where it concerns special needs kids, a thank you and a bow or curtsey are last on the list of those things to be taught. Most have a tube in their throat to breathe, can't speak, can't drink, and eat from a feeding tube in the tummy, most have yet to be toilet trained at age 8. Especially those born with an opening on their spine which make toilet training difficult, yet, most have normal IQ's but are developmentally slow due to a lack of schooling. This is where I come into play. I forget the so-called monkey signs and teach what they need, not what others want to see, in order to feel they did their duty on teaching them to sign thank you. That can come later. You should read better, I also teach remedial reading at any age. I never said, your thank you's are not important, I said, " other things are more important due to their dire needs.

    Wow, Ian, when I incorporate them into your world, our world, their parents world, their smiles and hugs are enough of thank you for me.

    No verbal thanks are ever needed here with me.

    * A note: The father of one of the little boys I am working with is British. He won't go over the signs I want him to with his son, instead, those which pleases his nurses. A big thank you! But, he still craps in the diaper. But, he does it very politely.
    Last edited by Cookie; 02-20-2011 at 08:10 AM.

  11. #11
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Want to see rude and get pushed, go to India or Russia.

  12. #12
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    I've done some more research.

    East Coast Americans seem to be particularly rude. Apparently in the South and West they have better manners.

  13. #13

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    I have a chemist friend who lives in Cambridge and he reads here often but won't post. He has a message for me to tell you, but, like I told him, "I can't post that here." lol. and, he was born and bred in England. Let's just politely say, he disagrees with you.

  14. #14

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    My question: What made the lesson rude?
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Fri Feb 18,
    Yahoo

    Nothing puts a damper on a serene afternoon's kayaking like the sight of a primeval sea monster.

    That was the rude lesson for Tom Pickles and Sarah Harrington, who'd taken their watercraft out on the foggy waters of Lake Windermere, only to encounter what appeared to be "an enormous snake" swimming by.

    "It was petrifying and we paddled back to the shore straight away. At first I thought it was a dog and then saw it was much bigger and moving really quickly at about 10 mph," the 24-year-old Pickles told The Telegraph. "Each hump was moving in a rippling motion and it was swimming fast. Its skin was like a seal's but its shape was completely abnormal—it's not like any animal I've ever seen before."

    But what did Pickles and Harrington expect? Didn't they know that Lake Windermere is reputedly the home of the British version of the Loch Ness monster? In the past five years, sojourners on the lake have reported eight sightings of a Nessie-like serpent.

    But the kayaking couple rallied from their shock and snapped the clearest photo of the Windermere "monster" since the sightings began. A journalism professor and his wife inaugurated the recent spate of Nessie-esque encounters on the lake back in 2006 reporting they had seen a "giant eel" somewhere between 15-20 feet long.

    Ever since then, researchers have set out upon the lake with sonar equipment, in pursuit of "Bow-Nessie," as the creature's British compatriots like to call it. But so far, their efforts haven't borne fruit.

    Of course, people in Scotland have reported sightings of the Loch Ness Monster since 1933, and even with dramatic advance sonar and video technology, Loch Ness research teams have likewise been unable to turn up any credible scientific evidence of its existence. Even its most noted hunter, Robert Rines, recently gave up his quest to find the beast after trying for nearly 40 years. "Unfortunately, I'm running out of age," the 85 year-old Rines said last year when he announced he was calling it quits.

    Meanwhile, Dr. Ian Winfield, a lake ecologist at the University of Lancaster, told The Sun he thinks the mysterious appartition people are seeing in Lake Windermere is merely a really big catfish. But all of this speculation overlooks the central mystery in the latest sighting: Why on earth would a couple go kayaking on an English lake in the middle of February?
    Last edited by Cookie; 02-20-2011 at 04:02 PM.

  15. #15
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dlarrivee View Post
    I'm from Canada, and I say "thank you" as long as the person in my path isn't American or British...
    LOL
    I compensate for polite fellow Canadians by being rude. Mind you, I'm an immigrant, albeit a Canadian citizen.

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