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Thread: Firewall Outlet Box Placement(s)

  1. #16
    Jack of all trades, Master of none KULTULZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post

    A fire wall will have rock between the two studed walls.

    If there is no rock between the studded walls then where is the fire protection?

    In a single family dwelling the wall that is between the attached garage and the interior of a house is a fire wall. A box that looks inside the home and a box that looks to the garage would require a fire pad.

    Although this is overlooked in most cases for a single family dwelling everyone worries about an apartment, why?
    MY main concern is liability. I surely do not want to be responsible for loss of life due to ignorance on my part. This is a kitchen re-do that just got out of hand due to poor builder craftsmanship. You wouldn't believe the electrical and plumbing faults I found behind that drywall. The whole thing snow balled on me.

    This is a dual wall with fire rated firewall (5/8") on either side with some additional panels added (previous crossover?) in between. There is a 3" air gap between the wall assemblies which I assume is for sound deadening. Fire rated QuietRock is going back up. It has sprinklers also.

    I was just confused about the whole thing until you educated me and for that I thank you immensely. It all makes perfect sense now but I just want to take a few extra steps. I now understand the differences in firewall design...

    I have just bought a house that has an attached garage and understand the firewall there. I will take it even further to not allow any fumes to enter the main house by sealing the garage off (no air leaks permitted).

    I will take a photo later today and show you how it was assembled.

    BTW- I am extremely anal if you haven't noticed.
    Jack of All Trades...

    ...Master of None...

  2. #17
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KULTULZ View Post
    MY main concern is liability.
    One of the things that I address on just about a daily basis is the compliance of an electrical installation. This comes up concerning Home Inspectors more often than not but every once in a while it comes up concerning an electrical contractor that has just entered the profession.

    Should an installation have been compliant when it was installed then it is compliant today even if we think it is unsafe. One example that keeps sticking its head out is GFCI protection. A house that has an outside receptacle that was built in the 60s is compliant with a regular duplex installed instead of a GFCI protected one. Would most think this needed to be changed to a GFCI device? Yes, but not required unless it was to be replaced due to any reason except the current code requirement.

    The same is true with the other trades. A washing machine with a 1 inch drain that was installed 20 years ago is code compliant today although a horizontal run would require a larger pipe to meet todays standards.

    What happens is someone new to the trades and not knowing the old codes would start making statements that this installation is not to code when they are in fact code compliant. I run into this in renovations all the time.
    Bottom line is; if it was compliant when installed it is still compliant today even if we think it is unsafe.

  3. #18
    Jack of all trades, Master of none KULTULZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post

    What happens is someone new to the trades and not knowing the old codes would start making statements that this installation is not to code when they are in fact code compliant. I run into this in renovations all the time.

    Bottom line is; if it was compliant when installed it is still compliant today even if we think it is unsafe.
    You misunderstood as I did not fully explain due to resizing photos (still learning here also). I realize what it is you are saying, but this is the first thing I found after stripping the cabinets-

    There was an illegal junction point @ the 20A MW outlet. I finally figured the electrician didn't pull enough wire and had to add to the run. The range outlet was also on this dedicated circuit.

    The more drywall I pulled, the more surprises I came across.

    I am concerned the neighboring wall was not properly built as a firewall which explains (hopefully) my wanting to make my side tighter.

    Comments welcome.
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