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Thread: Plug on Lamp Fixture in Cabinet only came with One Prong

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Trudijane's Avatar
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    Default Plug on Lamp Fixture in Cabinet only came with One Prong

    Hi,
    I've already bought a new lamp, however, I do like the original lamp that came with the cabinet (vintage) because it's smaller and the switch is on the lamp and not on the wire of the plus.

    So I just would like to replace end of the old plus with a compatible new plug. I'd rather not do it myself, but I also don't want to pay a fortune to an electrician to just do this for me.

    The guy in the hardware store knew exactly what to do, but they are not allowed. Is there someone who can explain exactly (preferably with a diagram) what I could do to fix the old plug, step by step? How much would an electrician charge.

    Thank you.

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    DIY Senior Member BobL43's Avatar
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    The guy at the hardware store could have told you what to do, but maybe he felt that you should not do it. Replacing an electrical plug on a lamp or any appliance must be done correctly so as not to create a shock hazard. the wide prong on the plug must be connected to the conductor that on the lamp end is connected to the shell (threaded part of the socket that the bulb screws into). The correct plug for the application is important too. I have never liked those plugs that the wire is pierced by, although they are the most compact and best looking ones. If done wrong, something as simple as replacing a plug can get you electrocuted or create a fire hazard. I have seen people's plug replacement jobs and was really surprised how things can go wrong. then again, Murphy said it best.
    I am definitely not a pro plumber, but I am a pro crastinator

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    I am a bit confused about what you want to do. First you say the fixture only has "one prong", which seems impossible if the light ever worked. Then you bought a new lamp, but prefer the old one which has the switch on the lamp. Then you want to replace the old plug with a "compatible new one". So the question are;
    1. Are you using the old fixture or the new one
    2. If using the old one, why do you have to change to a "compatible new plug".
    3. If you are using a new fixture, why do you have to change the "old plug".
    4. Before we could even attempt to tell you how to do it safely, and we might be reluctant to do it in any case since we cannot be sure you would do it properly, we really have to know what you are doing, why you are doing it, and what type of plug and receptacle do you have.

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member Trudijane's Avatar
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    Default Replacing a Plug

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL43 View Post
    The guy at the hardware store could have told you what to do, but maybe he felt that you should not do it. Replacing an electrical plug on a lamp or any appliance must be done correctly so as not to create a shock hazard. the wide prong on the plug must be connected to the conductor that on the lamp end is connected to the shell (threaded part of the socket that the bulb screws into). The correct plug for the application is important too. I have never liked those plugs that the wire is pierced by, although they are the most compact and best looking ones. If done wrong, something as simple as replacing a plug can get you electrocuted or create a fire hazard. I have seen people's plug replacement jobs and was really surprised how things can go wrong. then again, Murphy said it best.
    Thanks for responding. Your post convinced me even more that I need a professional to do it as how you described doing it is confusing to me and I definitely don't want to create a fire hazard or get electrocuted. I'll find someone who knows what they are doing.

    As a follow-up to this question, when I installed the new lamp, it didn't go through the hole made in the back of the cabinet (even when I made it bigger) so I bent the plug prongs a little so that it would fit and then moved them back into place. I read later that this too could be dangerous if plugged in afterward! It's working fine, but is there any danger to that?
    Thanks.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member Trudijane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    I am a bit confused about what you want to do. First you say the fixture only has "one prong", which seems impossible if the light ever worked. Then you bought a new lamp, but prefer the old one which has the switch on the lamp. Then you want to replace the old plug with a "compatible new one". So the question are

    I'll try and clarify your confusion. YES, the fixture on the original lamp only had one prong when I went to plug it in. I NEVER said the light worked. I knew it was broken and did not plug it in.

    1. Are you using the old fixture or the new one

    I never tried to use the old fixture! Why? Because the plug is broken. Therefore, I went out and bought a new lamp fixture which is installed and works.

    2. If using the old one, why do you have to change to a "compatible new plug".

    Where did I ever say I'm using the old one ????

    3. If you are using a new fixture, why do you have to change the "old plug".

    Please read my question more carefully. I like the old fixture better because it is "nicer, smaller, and the on/off switch is on the light and not on the wire. That's why I'd LIKE to fix the old plug!

    4. Before we could even attempt to tell you how to do it safely, and we might be reluctant to do it in any case since we cannot be sure you would do it properly, we really have to know what you are doing, why you are doing it, and what type of plug and receptacle do you have.
    I already know what I'm going to do per my last answer to my post. I'm going to let a professional fix the old one so i don't need your advice anymore. Thanks, anyway.

    T

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Where did I ever say I'm using the old one ????

    I guess when you said this in the original posting.
    So I just would like to replace end of the old plus with a compatible new plug.

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