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Thread: Proper moving of stove, fridge and DW to not damage vinyl floor?

  1. #1
    DIY Member topshot's Avatar
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    Default Proper moving of stove, fridge and DW to not damage vinyl floor?

    I've read several places that you shouldn't "scoot" heavy appliances into place as they can sometimes scuff up the floor, but I've never found what you SHOULD do to get them into their respective positions. I know when we moved our old appliances around to clean under them that the old vinyl did indeed get damaged sometimes. I don't want to mess up the new floor I'll be putting in.

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    DIY Member bsperr's Avatar
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    You could lay down cheap sheets of masonite to protect the floor as you move the appliances around.

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    i LIKE TO USE SHEETS OF 1/8" LUAN. iT IS SOLD AS DOOR SKIN IN THE STORES, VERY INEXPENSIVE, CUT IT WITH A UTILITY KNIFE.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Use a two wheel dolly or a furniture dolly to move them.

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    DIY Member topshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    Use a two wheel dolly or a furniture dolly to move them.
    So scooting the DW back from in front of the cabinet isn't an issue? I could see where you could get a stove or fridge very close to final resting place with a dolly.

    With sheets of stuff, I assume you'd lay the sheet maybe halfway back in the space, and once the appliance was in place tip it up slightly to slide the sheet out. That would mean any potential damage would be under the unit where it would never be seen.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Some dishwashers have wheels at the rear to help roll them in, but even if yours does not, you insert the DW into the opening, then lift the front while pushing it in so that any "scratches" occur UNDER the dishwasher, not on the floor in front of it.

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    DIY Member topshot's Avatar
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    OK. I didn't think there's be enough clearance to tip it up. I've never worked with a DW before.

    Do you normally use 3/8 copper for the connection or stick with 1/2? I'd assume the former would be more flexible to help get it lined up precisely. The instructions say it should come out AT LEAST 19" from wall, 2" from floor and 2" from the side. I was thinking using 3/8 and making it 19.5"

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    I use a 3/8x60" braided metallic flexible supply line. What kind of dishwasher is it?

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    DIY Member topshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    I use a 3/8x60" braided metallic flexible supply line. What kind of dishwasher is it?
    Well, that would make it easy. So you attach the line first and then move it back instead of having to deal with working through the small front panel.

    It's a GE GDWF160RSS

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    DIY Junior Member DanTee's Avatar
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    we used to use these a lot in the higher end homes we worked on http://www.shagtools.com/tools/Natio...of-2-55-93.cfm

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Either that or connect the line to the valve, pass it through the hole, and then feed it to the adapter on the valve and tighten it. Remember to slide the drain hose and power cord through the hole before you slide it in. Another option are the "E-Z mover" pads sold in hardware stores. You could leave them under the appliances in case you have to slide them out some day, which is often a lot harder than sliding them in.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    The braided metallic hoses are the only way to go IMHO. There's plenty of room under the DW for the extra hose and it makes moving the DW in and/or out much easier. Same idea with the ice maker line on the fridge. In fact, most everything gets connected with flex lines anymore. Shower, toilet, sink, water heater, gas stove, and washing machine all use flex although not all the same kind of flex of course.

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    DIY Member topshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    Another option are the "E-Z mover" pads sold in hardware stores.
    You mean those teflon discs/squares? I'd have thought those would raise it up too high, but I'll look into them.

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    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsperr View Post
    You could lay down cheap sheets of masonite to protect the floor as you move the appliances around.
    Ja, that's what I use. In fact I store them in the gap between the fridge and wall.

    The fridge gets moved out and in often for cleaning. The gas stove does not as I don't want repeated flexing of the gas line.

  15. #15
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The units should have adjustable feet to compensate for the added height, which is really not that much anyway.

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