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Thread: Washer Standpipe Drain

  1. #1
    DIY Member SS's Avatar
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    Default Washer Standpipe Drain

    Hello,

    This is a photo of my washer drain standpipe going into the slab.

    Can you please describe what you see, in terms of how things are set up.

    Thanks.

    Name:  ss_standpipe2.jpg
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    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink


    A little hard to see above. The yellow line below shows the edge of what's going into the slab.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink

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    Last edited by Terry; 05-28-2011 at 09:48 AM. Reason: trying to get photo to display

  2. #2
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    What are we supposed to see? Is there a trap? Is the pipe 2" or larger? Is there a vent? Back off a bit so we can see more of the drain.
    Last edited by Gary Swart; 05-27-2011 at 09:17 PM.

  3. #3
    DIY Member SS's Avatar
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    The first pictures show the 1-1/2" standpipe going into the floor. I am wondering what the setup is into the drain.

    Here is a picture further back, showing the standpipe itself.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink

  4. #4
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    If I am seeing this right, there isn't much right about this. First, it would appear that the standpipe comes down into a P trap which is OK, but then the pipe goes into the wall and elbows down. Since there is no vent between the trap and the elbow, this creates an illegal S trap. Next problem. New washers empty their water much faster than older ones. This has lead to a requirement that washer drains be 2" minimum. Usually this means a 2" standpipe, trap and then somewhere after that into a 3" or 4" main drain.

  5. #5
    DIY Member SS's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input. Was trying to pump for information without influencing with details.

    Yes, this is a gawd awful setup and drain. All plumbers who see it heave. It is subject to clogs each year and overflow which I'm hoping to improve. I have also just learned about the new washers and their outflow.

    I'm getting estimates on having it reworked better. It was pointed out yesterday that the 1-1/2" standpipe might actually be running into a 2" drain so the pipe could be increased.

    I now see what they are saying and am wondering about that wider piece at the base that the pipe is fitting into. What is it and why, can it be removed so the pipe can be enlarged to 2", etc.

    On the s-trap, what type of curve should be reconfigured?

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    We do not see what the P trap is connecting to so it is strictly an assumption that it is an elbow, creating an S trap, rather than a tee which would be proper. I have to take your word for it being 1 1/2" because it LOOKS LIKE 2", but we have nothing to compare the size to. There seems to be a "dogleg" at the floor for some reason, but we also have NOTHING which would cause us to assume you have a 2" line which would be easily accessible.

  7. #7
    DIY Member SS's Avatar
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    Yes, I'm wondering how the pipe is connected to the drain at the floor. A plumber who was here said it looked like it might be running into a 2" drain, rather than a 1-1/2" drain -- I assume because it is slipping inside of something larger for some reason (looks like iron pipe to me). He said it's hard to see what's going on or why. He didn't seem to think it was normal.

    I am hoping it's not a 1-1/2" drain below and that someone would recognize the connector piece and whether it could be fitting into a drain larger than 1-1/2". What it's purpose would be if not. I guess you're saying it's an elbow of some sort that could have 1-1/2" fittings at both ends?

    The whole washer drain situation needs to be remedied. 1-1/2" is not to code or sufficient; moreso with the new washers coming along.

    It will be changed to a T-trap.

    The standpipe is definitely 1-1/2" and undersized, as every plumber has stated.

    1973 townhouse, previously apartments.

    Thanks.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    I can't believe nobody had replaced that yet.

    Someone busted a hole in the fitting, and used a kitchen sink deck cover on the hole.

    What is it about Atlanta?
    We have more stories about hack plumbing from Atlanta then other other city in the US.


  9. #9
    DIY Member SS's Avatar
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    Hi Terry,

    I can't believe it either. Many a plumber has been through here over the years (often for drain cleaning) and I've asked about the setup and its problems. They all are sick when they see it. This is the first time it's come up about the odd connection to the drain and what size the pipe might be underneath to change it to a 2" standpipe.

    Yes, the guy who initially worked on the kitchen was an unbelievable hack. He was hired by a developer to convert these apartments into townhomes.


    Someone busted a hole in the fitting, and used a kitchen sink deck cover on the hole

    Can you explain this more? Busted a hole in what fitting? Any idea about the drain size from what can be seen or was done?

    I don't think busting up the kitchen floor is going to happen, if a change can't be made in the near vicinity of what is seen here (a dishwasher over concrete is on the other side of the wall and can be hammered there but beyond the d/w is tile).

    One plumber said he would chip some of the concrete away to try to see what was going on.

    Thanks for identifying the part!

    SS
    Last edited by SS; 05-28-2011 at 10:06 AM.

  10. #10
    DIY Member SS's Avatar
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    Are you saying that rusty iron piece that the pipe fits into is a kitchen sink deck cover? What would be its purpose? Does the other end below the surface also fit over a 1-1/2" pipe?

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Name:  kitchen_sink_hole_cover.jpg
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    They used one of these for a plug. Or at least something like this.
    If anyone replumbs the upper part, you might have them install a proper cleanout on the verical section after the p-trap. That way the plumber can run a snake through the line better.

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    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
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    Looks to me that 1.5" copper is cemented into 2" cast iron.You would need to remove the copper,once that is done then have C.I. rodded out then rebuild using the proper connectors.Can you find a vent as it will be needed.

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    DIY Member SS's Avatar
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    I see what you're talking about, Terry. Yes the blasted boiler plug that collects debris, pin rusts apart, and I can't get it back on tightly if I try to clean it out myself. With the first snaking, a hole was cut in the pipe for that.

  14. #14
    DIY Member SS's Avatar
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    CY, thanks. The plumber did say something about it looking cemented in; maybe a 2". Now I can see what you're all talking about. I chipped a little away to see the pipe rim size better. So, the pipe looks placed up against the pipe on the right side and the void on the left near the dime is filled. It does look more like 1/4" of fill, to me. Is there a 1-3/4" drain size? Hopefully it's filled around the standpipe perimeter more than I can see. Yellow lines show the rim edge of the iron drain pipe

    Is cementing a pipe in an accepted practice? Sounds like it could be another reason why this drain has clogging problems, if some got down inside.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink
    Last edited by SS; 05-28-2011 at 11:48 AM.

  15. #15
    DIY Member SS's Avatar
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    I think when you say vent, you mean a trap? One of the plumbers who came through described what he would do which would bring it to code. I think this was in hopes that it was a 2" pipe.

    Right now the washer and water heater release valve fit into the top of the standpipe. The dishwasher drain also runs into the side of the pipe directly somewhat mid-way down.

    I hate to misrepresent his idea, but it was something like below (can't remember the shape of the trap he drew). He would put separate traps for each of the lines dropping into the pipe -- washer, dishwasher, water heater release valve.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink

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