(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: water main line

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member wescoaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    2

    Default water main line

    Hi,

    My main waterline broke a few feet on my side of the city valve. My house is slab on grade and I assume that the waterline is at least 18" deep however the shutoff was at least three feet down so it could be more. I know the main comes into the house under the slab to the middle of the house where the utility room is.

    The plumber who attended to shut off the water is suggesting that I go into the exterior wall and up in to the floor joist cavity of the second floor rather than breaking up the concrete in the house. While this is doable from the access stand point, I am a little confused (after the fact) on how he would get out of the ground and into the side of the house if he does not come through the footing. I can't see that he would come up BESIDE the house and then enter the structure as, I assume, this would create a potential freeze issue.

    It's definitely an easier route, as opposed to breaking 20 some feet of concrete floor but....


    Any thoughts on the matter would be appreciated, thanks!

  2. #2
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Land of Cheese
    Posts
    3,142

    Default

    You would need to break concrete to get it into an interior wall to be sure to prevent freezing. You need to research the frost depths for proper burial depth, as it may need to be 3' deep all the way into the house.

  3. #3
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,195
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Running a main water line up the outside of a home is not an option.

    You could enter the home near the outside wall, by breaking concrete inside, and then once inside follow the floor joist toward then interior where the previous connection was made.

    I know it's Vancouver, but it still gets pretty cold there.
    In Seattle, we need at least 24" of cover and we're South of you.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,624

    Default

    What kind of pipe is it, and why can't it be repaired, unless it is a rusted galvanized line, which would be unusual to go that far under the house before it came out of the floor.

  5. #5
    In the Trades SacCity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    189

    Default

    I see the advantage of Caifornia,
    We run the water main up near the house, 12 inches of cover for the water main. Once near the house we bump out through the ground put in a water main valve a hose bib and pop into the wall. Generally all exposed copper or schedule 80 plastic, no insulation nor protection....
    Michael
    Sacramento, CA

  6. #6
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Land of Cheese
    Posts
    3,142

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SacCity View Post
    I see the advantage of Caifornia,
    We run the water main up near the house, 12 inches of cover for the water main. Once near the house we bump out through the ground put in a water main valve a hose bib and pop into the wall. Generally all exposed copper or schedule 80 plastic, no insulation nor protection....
    Michael
    Sacramento, CA
    You would have fun working in northern WI for a few weeks. Our water line came up in the middle of the basement. The shut off at the street was about 10 feet below grade.

  7. #7
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,195
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Here is an instance in the Seattle area where we needed a back flow device above ground and a way to keep it from freezing.

    Name:  ballmer_backflow_1.jpg
Views: 349
Size:  34.4 KB

    We had to dig a ditch 80 feet for the electrical. The other plumbing contractor was going to lay an extension cord on the ground. This is right near the kids play things, so we didn't think that would be a good idea. You don't want someone tripping over a cord and unplugging it.

    Name:  ballmer_backflow_b1.jpg
Views: 444
Size:  58.5 KB

    A nice fake rock to cover and protect the back flow.

    Name:  ballmer_backflow_35.jpg
Views: 451
Size:  44.8 KB
    Last edited by Terry; 04-09-2011 at 07:17 PM.

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member wescoaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    2

    Default

    The existing line is poly butylene (I think) about 22 yrs old and grey in colour but appears to be a pex compression type crimp at the adapter into the shut off valve. the break is closer to the street valve, in the middle of the driveway. If I ha ve to dig to get to the break, I will be replacing the whole line instead of gambling on the material not failing again. Why so far into the house? No idea, I didn't build it!

  9. #9
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,624

    Default

    IF we were allowed to install a bypass around an RPPBFP valve, it would have to have a locking valve, and the city might want the key to it, so the user could not just isolate the valve and then open the bypass when the valve started dumping water.

  10. #10
    Plumbing Contractor for 49 years johnjh2o1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    South*East
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    IF we were allowed to install a bypass around an RPPBFP valve, it would have to have a locking valve, and the city might want the key to it, so the user could not just isolate the valve and then open the bypass when the valve started dumping water.
    I was thinking the same thing. It kind of defeats the purpose of the RPZ. If the occasion occurs when a bypass its needed we have to install a second RPZ on the bypass.

    John
    Last edited by johnjh2o1; 04-10-2011 at 09:10 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. Main Water line not working
    By LauraMM in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-18-2008, 06:56 PM
  2. main water line mystery
    By budice in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-20-2008, 09:00 AM
  3. Main Water Supply Line
    By cybervex in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-08-2008, 06:46 AM
  4. main water line break
    By flabbb in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-17-2007, 12:11 PM
  5. Replacing Main Water line
    By Derik in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-17-2006, 06:00 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •