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Thread: AFCI's

  1. #1
    sea-bee chuck b's Avatar
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    Default AFCI's

    Rewiring s small 650 square foot lake cabin.

    Will install AFCI protected circuits for the bedroom receptacles. Wondering if the light fixtures controlled switches and smoke alarms need to also be protected.

    Will install smoke detectors inside each bedroom. Would one detector be sufficient outside as both door are next to one another.

    Would one 15-amp circuit covering say 8 receptacles, 3-4 smoke alarms, and four light switches to control two ceiling fans and an attached lights not over tax the circuit. Two - a rare maximum of four persons will inhabit this season cottage. Thaks.

  2. #2
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Which code cycle are you under?

    Every circit except for the kitchen, bath, and outside should be AFCI protected.

    You will need at least two 15 amp circuits for the general lighting and receptacle circuit for this 650 square feet living space.

    Yes all receptacles and lights inclucing the smoke alarms will need AFCI protection

  3. #3
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    jw, can you expand on this to say what the requirements would be for AFCI or GFCI in a basement where part is finished and part is unfinished?

    What if a circuit supplies both the finished and unfinished areas?


    Thanks!

  4. #4
    sea-bee chuck b's Avatar
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    guessing that includes the small living area by your definitions. the utility and bathrooms and kitchen and outside receptacles would be gfi protected. since i will run two circuits in the kitchen will use gfi receptacles. this type of gfi is convenient for point of use resets. when is a gfi "breaker" a good idea? also, is both a breaker gfi and a receptacle gfi of any use to be extra safe, or does this redundancy somehow lower their effectiveness. thanks! chuck b

  5. #5
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck b View Post
    guessing that includes the small living area by your definitions. the utility and bathrooms and kitchen and outside receptacles would be gfi protected. since i will run two circuits in the kitchen will use gfi receptacles. this type of gfi is convenient for point of use resets. when is a gfi "breaker" a good idea? also, is both a breaker gfi and a receptacle gfi of any use to be extra safe, or does this redundancy somehow lower their effectiveness. thanks! chuck b
    Using both will not hurt but it will not help either and cost more

  6. #6
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cacher_chick View Post
    jw, can you expand on this to say what the requirements would be for AFCI or GFCI in a basement where part is finished and part is unfinished?

    What if a circuit supplies both the finished and unfinished areas?


    Thanks!
    If part is finished that part will require AFCI protection for the entire circuit so replace the breaker and use GFCI receptacles in the unfinished part

  7. #7
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    My approved plans for a new house show AFCI's only in bedroom outlet circuits. Why?

  8. #8
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Because California has not caught up with the rest of America and still uses an outdated code cycle. I think you are still on the 2005 cycle

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