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Thread: Penguin Toilets W/ Overflow Protections

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  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Default Penguin Toilets W/ Overflow Protections

    Hi All,

    I discovered the Penguin Toilet and would like to know if anybody has any experience with them. I'm looking for a toilet that is least likely to clog and overflow. The penguin has been used by some apartment complexes and housing authorities.

    Here's the Penguin:
    http://www.penguintoilets.com/

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    Last edited by Terry; 03-22-2011 at 09:50 PM.
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  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    That is hilarious.

    What happens when you get a clog downstream of the trap way?

  3. #3
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I think I'll stay with my two Toto toilets that don't clog to begin with.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The "trap" for the overflow feature REQUIRES water to flow into the overflow openings or it will dry out and allow sewer gases into the room. That will only happen when the toilet is plugged and ready to overflow.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    It never ceases to amaze me how many of us try to find a "better" toilet when there are Toto toilets in almost every price range. Maybe "better" is the wrong word...perhaps "cheaper"? This is another Mexican import, supposedly made by a known brand name company. Now, who do we know that makes their toilets in Mexico and seem to have a bad reputation for quality control?

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    It does appear that the overflow is not tied into the main trap. Could this be resolved if a whole-house trap was in place? It won't stop a clog beyond the trap, but no toilet can do that. The Syracuse, NY housing authority is apparently using these.
    "Any American who is prepared to run for President should automatically, by definition, be disqualified from ever doing so."
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    DIY Member spta97's Avatar
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    Default Toilets with Overflow Protection?

    I was at Lowes browsing and saw this toilet:

    http://www.lowes.com/pd_164841-19225...=#BVRRWidgetID

    I thought the overflow protection was a great idea. Any opinions on this? The online reviews seem to be great.

    They had this and what looked like a Fluidmaster next to it with a dual flush (up and down for #1 / #2) that had the same overflow but I didn't catch the model.

    Just curious what people thought (and I searched so my apologies if I missed a post covering this already).

  8. #8
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    There's no guarantee it would prevent overflow...it will only (potentially) work if the toilet's trap is plugged...not if the drain line is clogged.

    Also, no low-flow toilet will overflow the bowl unless you keep flushing it over again. If it didn't go down the first time, it's unlikely to go down when you flush again while the bowl is not overfilled.
    Jim DeBruycker
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    DIY Member spta97's Avatar
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    Good points though I don't really see a down side to it?

    I have to admit I overflowed toilets in the past because I thought "this one will clear it!". I do beleive they were not low flow though.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Way back when, a toilet might use 7-8 gallons, and the bowl is no where near big enough. Then, they dropped them to 3.5, and those might overflow, then they dropped all the new ones to 1.6g or less and those will not overflow a bowl as long as you started out 'normal'. House brands tend to sometimes be good, and some are bad but built to a price. Pegasus may or may not be a decent toilet, regardless of the overflow protection.
    Jim DeBruycker
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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Member spta97's Avatar
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    Reviews on the site seem good so may be worth some additional investigation. Thanks to the mod for combinding this thread. I didn't think about the mess that overflow could cause. Hmmm.

    As posted in another thread I have clogged the drake on several occasions. I have never been able to clog my pressure assist but not sure if I feel like spending that much for a basement toilet. I also worry about it losing pressure after long periods of non use. Just keeping an eye out for alternatives and this seemed like an ingenious idea.

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    DIY Junior Member dihewidd's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Penguin Overflow Proof Toilet vs. Toto

    At our hotels, we began installing Toto toilets per your recommendation on your blog and we love them.

    We have one tough location that we are about to replace the existing American Standard in with a Toto ADA compliant 3" flush valve elongated model, which is our preferred. In this public restroom, guests often clog it and then flush repeatedly, causing the bowl to overflow into the shop on the next floor down.

    Toto doesn't offer overflow protection that we know of, though they are very hard to clog which is an overflow protection in itself.

    Do you have experience with Penguin's model 524? It's ADA compliant, 3" flush, glazed trap, elongated with overflow protection (three holes at top of bowl with separate drain). It's $169 compared to Toto's $275.

    Thank you for your reply!

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    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dihewidd View Post
    At our hotels, we began installing Toto toilets per your recommendation on your blog and we love them.

    We have one tough location that we are about to replace the existing American Standard in with a Toto ADA compliant 3" flush valve elongated model, which is our preferred. In this public restroom, guests often clog it and then flush repeatedly, causing the bowl to overflow into the shop on the next floor down.

    Toto doesn't offer overflow protection that we know of, though they are very hard to clog which is an overflow protection in itself.
    I think you answered your own question. The best protection against overflows is a toilet that doesn't clog often.

    Not only that, but if it's a 1.28 gallon-per-flush Drake, when/if it does clog it is going to take a whole lot of flushes to overflow it. Because of the refill time, that means a guest is standing over the thing for a long time while it refills and they try to flush again. Most would just abandon it after the second flush, which wouldn't overflow it. Also, a solid second flush might clear the Drake.

    I'd go with the Drake, and put up a little sign that says, "If toilet clogs, call Maintenance at X1234 and we will respond promptly." You are not likely to get many calls. If you do, then Plan B is to add a little sign that suggests that folks: "Hold flush handle down an extra second if flushing larger volumes of solids." or something equally-tasteful. We all know that an extra second of water in the Drake will clear even a small mountain of Charmin Ultra.

    If you didn't know the above, then you should buy and install a Drake in your home or hotel office bathroom so that you gain a better appreciation of what you are dealing with: a toilet where the technology-development money has been invested in the design of the long-lasting china, so that it can use very simple, readily-available, internal parts. Ten years from now, try finding a replacement part for some of the more exotic "canister flushes", "cylinder flushes", "pressure assist flushes" etc. The ridiculous American Standard Galleria one-piece lowboy in my city apartment bathroom has almost-totally-custom parts (although some parts made for a similarly-dumb Kohler may be adapted to it). Accordingly, IF I can find a part online, like a ballcock or fill valve, it's going to cost me $150. So instead I would have to pay a plumber to rebuild the existing parts, which will cost a comparable amount. In contrast, twenty years from now, approved generic substitutes for those simple Drake parts will still be available around the corner, even if one lives in Oshkosh. That's the genius of the thinking going on at Toto.

    As to the price difference, because you are a regular reader of this forum you know that you're going to get what you pay for. Once you get below the price for Totos, you're going to be talking about more "disposable" products.

    Finally, if price is really that critical to you, as a hotel, you can probably negotiate a better price on the Drake with a local supply house than you are quoting. If your own employees are installing the toilet and you just want the toilet, you can find the CST744EL or CST744SL. Just do a little research. If you are having a plumber install it, then you do the right thing and buy it from him, because we all realize you are getting a little better price on the install because the plumber is rightfully-making a little profit on the unit, and also will usually give you a two-year warranty on his work, which is part of what you are paying him for.
    Last edited by Terry; 06-26-2012 at 10:15 AM.

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