(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Two simple questions about threaded nipples

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member Andrew21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    161

    Default Two simple questions about threaded nipples

    Hey all,

    Quick questions here.

    1. I'm installing a shower body valve with the plaster guard. If I set the plaster guard correctly where the CBU and the tile are flush with the plaster guard, this means when I'm installing the rest of the trim pieces later, I won't have a problem correct?

    2. I'm going to use these 90 degree elbows with threads on one side for the drain spout and the shower head. How do I gauge how deep this will be with the spout and shower head? Or should i buy the ones without the tabs/ears? I know I have to set a 2x4 or something so it doesn't move but I don't this to protrude out too much or recessed where I can't get to it.

    Name:  andrew21_drop_ear.jpg
Views: 613
Size:  53.1 KB

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Terry; 03-19-2011 at 11:06 AM.

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    Generally, the plaster guard has lines on it representing the range of tolerance. Or the thickness of the plaster guard itself IS the range of tolerance.

    Set a wood block such that the face of the dog ear elbow will be somewhere behind the inner surface of the rough wall. If you use a threaded elbow, you have to fine tune the final length of the tub spout nipple. Hard to plan this down to the 1/16" in advance. The easiest to work with are:
    > stub out copper pipe instead, and use a slip spout
    > stub ou the threaded nipple, and use a Delta spout with adapter....plenty of tolerance on length with that one.

  3. #3
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,687

    Default

    The face of the plaster guard should be flush with the finished wall. There is a degree of tolerance with all valves, but with some it has a very narrow range. The elbows can be almost ANYWHERE behind the wall. You use the proper sized nipple to connect the spout to it, and the shower arm is long enough to reach the elbow.

  4. #4
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    NW Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,690

    Default

    As others have said, normally the plaster guard would be flush with the face of the tile. There should be instructions with the rough-in explaining it. At least there were with my Delta Monitor.

    When mounting the dog ear elbow for a shower arm or tub spout the spacing is not critical unless the tub spout does not have a range of adjustment. If installing a wall union however, it can be harder to get it right. What I did with mine was to built some flex into the 3/4" plywood blocking by drilling a series of holes into it.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LLigetfa View Post
    What I did with mine was to built some flex into the 3/4" plywood blocking by drilling a series of holes into it.
    What is the point of blocking then?

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member Andrew21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    161

    Default

    Thanks for the replies!

    I just found out by placing a piece of cbu around the plaster guard that I have it all set right including thinset. Looks like everything will be flush.

    As regards to the elbows, I see that there are different ways to do this. The reason why I'm asking is that when I did this in my co-op, I had a plumber do this. He just set the elbow(without ears) with NO backing and said to give him some room for the spout and the showerhead. I saw him install the showerhead and it was easy. Since he didn't have a piece of a 1/2 threaded pipe, I had to do it. Seems that it was pretty easy to do. Had some 'depth' to play with which was good.

    Since I have the Delta product, if I stub it out, will there be an adapter I can use to put this on or are they interchangeable?

    Thanks

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member Andrew21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    The face of the plaster guard should be flush with the finished wall. There is a degree of tolerance with all valves, but with some it has a very narrow range. The elbows can be almost ANYWHERE behind the wall. You use the proper sized nipple to connect the spout to it, and the shower arm is long enough to reach the elbow.
    Thanks HJ. Sounds what my previous plumber did in my co-op

  8. #8
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    NW Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,690

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dlarrivee View Post
    What is the point of blocking then?
    Consider it a spring-loaded block that will hold the union tight to the tile maintaining the seal. Threaded nipples don't come in an infinite variety of lengths and threading my own to get it just right was not something I wanted to do.

  9. #9
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    NW Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,690

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew21 View Post
    Since I have the Delta product, if I stub it out, will there be an adapter I can use to put this on or are they interchangeable?

    Thanks
    Delta makes several styles that vary in how they get fitted. Some spouts slip over a stub and are held by a set screw. Some use a stub with straight threads on one end and the spout has only to be threaded as far as necessary. Others use tapered threads and you need to choose your nipple length with care. Again, the manual that comes with yours should provide the specifics.

  10. #10
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,446

    Default

    You want the el screwed into blocking so it doesn't spring in or out, or your shower arm or spout will not be stable. A lot of the pros like the Delta pull-down diverter spout. The thing screws onto an adapter that you solder onto your pipe...it is very flexible on getting it 'just right'.

    The manufacturer's depth marks for the valve body represent the range of where the trim will attach...not necessarily where you or your significant other prefer it for best looks. So, before you anchor it down, get out the trim and temporarily attach it in a mock up to see how YOU like it, and block it there. There are at least a couple of threads here about it sticking out too far. If you go too far the other way, you may need to buy an extension kit, and then it may still stick out too far. The manufacturer's only interested, in most cases, that the trim fits...not what everyone thinks looks best.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  11. #11
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,221
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    You can't worry that much at rough, if the valve is set right, you make do with the other stuff.
    The shower arms are never a problem. I like those backed and screwed in hard.

    If you don't have the Delta tub spout, which in many plumbers opinion is the best and easiest to use, then you may use a slip spout.
    If you have the threaded brass nipple, like you would use for the drop ear, you do have nipples spaced in 1/2" increments. The threads are not cut straight, they have a taper to them, thus allowing some tolerance as to how far you can thread them in and still make the proper seal. I use a 6" nipple for the tub spout loose; thread it in loose, and measure the difference. Then I remove it and use a size that I now know will work. Sometimes you thread them in easy, and at other times, you need to use some plumber muscle. Either way, it works. It isn't like brain surgery.


  12. #12
    DIY Senior Member Andrew21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    161

    Default

    Thank you all. I just placed everything in before soldering (wait till the weekend) and everything looks right.

    The tub spout has this nifty connector where you solder on and then screw the spout on. Now I know what you guys are talking about. I'm going to put a 90 degree elbow and then screen in a threaded piece in for the spout. I did that before so I'm comfy with it.

    Thanks all. I have another question but I'll post it in the correct forum.


  13. #13
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    NW Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,690

    Default

    I think you should use a drop ear for the spout, not an unsupported elbow. Some people tend to grab the spout getting in and out of the tub and you want it well supported. If need be, you can use a pair of 45 degree elbows to offset the drop ear to the right depth.

Similar Threads

  1. 2 simple questions about my Toto
    By a_nickel_and_a_fish-stick in forum Toilet Forum discussions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-23-2010, 03:03 PM
  2. Need help with leaking nipples
    By mears in forum Irrigation / Sprinkler Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-07-2008, 11:13 AM
  3. Nipples
    By Ian Gills in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-19-2008, 03:48 PM
  4. 3 Simple Questions
    By molo in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-14-2007, 09:05 AM
  5. Brass Nipples
    By raeiken in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-07-2006, 06:59 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •