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Thread: Stove Wire Repair

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member Kiko's Avatar
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    Default Stove Wire Repair

    One of the wires to a stove burner shorted out (I think the cleaning lady had pulled on it ). Now, I need to cut off several inches of burned out wire and add a few inches of new wire so it will be long enough to reach the ceramic connector at the burner.

    The wire says 150 C, but I can't make out the AWG. Does anyone know the correct replacement wire for this, and if I can just use a high temp wire nut to complete the repair?

  2. #2
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Instead of repairing the conductor why not replace the entire length using a Type Z or TFE conductor?

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member Kiko's Avatar
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    My other option is to replace the entire wire harness, which I would prefer to avoid, since I only need about 4" of wire replaced.

    My main concern is finding the correct gauge wire. I called two place that sell high temp conductors by the foot, but they are both 14 gauge. That just doesn't seem right for a stove burner??

  4. #4
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    14 ga. wire will handle 15 amps. That is 3600 watts, 240, and the burners are not that big.

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    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    If you insist on patching the wire please use a ceramic wire nut

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member Kiko's Avatar
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    I've already bought the ceramic wire nut.

    Second question: is there a place on my Croc's wire stripper to crimp on a high temp crimp terminal? Can a pliers work? Or do I need to buy a special crimper?






    Last edited by Kiko; 03-07-2011 at 05:47 PM.

  7. #7
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiko View Post
    I've already bought the ceramic wire nut.

    Second question: is there a place on my Croc's wire stripper to crimp on a high temp crimp terminal? Can a pliers work? Or do I need to buy a special crimper?



    why not just buy a ceramic twist on wire nut?
    The use of a pressure connector you take a chance of damaging the insulation and you will be right back to where you are now

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member Kiko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post
    why not just buy a ceramic twist on wire nut?
    The use of a pressure connector you take a chance of damaging the insulation and you will be right back to where you are now
    The ceramic wire nut is to connect one end to the existing conductor. The crimp-on terminal is what is needed to connect the other end to the burner. A screw passes through the eye of the terminal, and holds it in place. So, will I need a special crimping tool, or will my Croc's work for this?

    Last edited by Kiko; 03-07-2011 at 07:04 PM.

  9. #9
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiko View Post
    The ceramic wire nut is to connect one end to the existing conductor. The crimp-on terminal is what is needed to connect the other end to the burner. A screw passes through the eye of the terminal, and holds it in place. So, will I need a special crimping tool, or will my Croc's work for this?

    Yes I am stupid and this proves it.
    Squeeze her down

  10. #10
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Because of the heat, there is more expansion/contraction of the connectors and it becomes somewhat critical to ensure you get a good crimp. If it isn't tight enough or properly indented, it can loosen, change the resistance, and fail again. There are calibrated crimping tools that won't release until you've completed the proper compression. They have fingers or shaping dies designed for the specific connector, wire size, and application. You may not have trouble, but it is a potential weak point if it is not done well.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  11. #11
    DIY Senior Member Kiko's Avatar
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    Turned out, I didn't need to splice in any new wire. I just crimped on new terminals (I ended up replacing four terminals) using a vice grips and got a nice crimp.

    Thanks to all who responded.

  12. #12
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    If you did NOT get a good crimp, you will eventually know about it when the added restistance causes the connection to burn out again.

  13. #13
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    If you did NOT get a good crimp, you will eventually know about it when the added restistance causes the connection to burn out again.

    message deleted, I told you this type of post would not be allowed

    See the highlighted part in the quote above
    Last edited by jwelectric; 03-09-2011 at 08:00 AM.

  14. #14
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    How do you crimp anything with vice grips? May as well use a hammer.

  15. #15
    DIY Senior Member Kiko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    How do you crimp anything with vice grips? May as well use a hammer.
    I thought it was strange too, but the owner of the hardware store where I bought the terminals suggested it, and the connections seemed very good.

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