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Thread: 220v to 110v

  1. #46
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Regarding your experience with a steel screw in a cast zinc-aluminum box, and wire nuts outdoors, you must do your work in Kuwait or the Sahara, and commute to humid NC. Actually steel screws in aluminum- zinc boxes would corrode even there from dew.

    An old tool designer/ mentor of mine taught me to use EAR WAX on bolts and nuts when you are in a bind and want the connection to never corrode. Never use Q-tips to clean your ears. Use a small flat screwdriver or tree branch and put it into your wire nuts. [not OSHA approved]

    But ground clamps have no UL tag or NEC oversight, and so all kind of garbage comes in from India and china for the sake of a profit to the peddler.

    Copper corrodes quite nicely if you keep it damp and wind it up in a steel spring. Do a search for statue of liberty repairs, its quite interesting. Copper and steel makes a good battery, and the french Laquered or varnished the steel frame, but wherever it was too thin, everything turned to dust.

    Some old electrical books says electricians used Mobil 29 grease on connections for corrosion protection before anyone made a specific product.

    Even lard or goose grease in a outdoor wire nut would be better than nothing. You can run with that thought! I'll send it to the NEC.
    Last edited by ballvalve; 12-02-2010 at 09:50 AM.

  2. #47
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    Regarding your experience with a steel screw in a cast zinc-aluminum box, and wire nuts outdoors, you must do your work in Kuwait or the Sahara, and commute to humid NC. Actually steel screws in aluminum- zinc boxes would corrode even there from dew.

    An old tool designer/ mentor of mine taught me to use EAR WAX on bolts and nuts when you are in a bind and want the connection to never corrode. Never use Q-tips to clean your ears. Use a small flat screwdriver or tree branch and put it into your wire nuts. [not OSHA approved]

    But ground clamps have no UL tag or NEC oversight, and so all kind of garbage comes in from India and china for the sake of a profit to the peddler.

    Copper corrodes quite nicely if you keep it damp and wind it up in a steel spring. Do a search for statue of liberty repairs, its quite interesting. Copper and steel makes a good battery, and the french Laquered or varnished the steel frame, but wherever it was too thin, everything turned to dust.

    Some old electrical books says electricians used Mobil 29 grease on connections for corrosion protection before anyone made a specific product.

    Even lard or goose grease in a outdoor wire nut would be better than nothing. You can run with that thought! I'll send it to the NEC.




    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    But ground clamps have no UL tag or NEC oversight, and so all kind of garbage comes in from India and china for the sake of a profit to the peddler.
    Well then explain what this means. I found it in 250.64(F) of the NEC
    Connections shall be made by a listed connector or by the exothermic welding process.
    I also wonder just what UL Standard 467 is all about, could it be grounding equipment?


    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    Even lard or goose grease in a outdoor wire nut would be better than nothing. You can run with that thought! I'll send it to the NEC.
    Be sure to do just that. I will be looking for it in the ROPs

    The one thing that I do know for sure is that you have no clue of what you are talking about

  3. #48
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Steel in zinc aluminum outside MUST corrode unless greased or pasted. Fact of physics.

    Again, if yours do not corrode you must be doing your work in Kuwait.

    Thats a silcone grease in the wire nuts and it prevents corrosion from moisture.

    The old street wise handymen used ear wax in a pinch for a lubricant on bolts and nuts and wood screws before we had battery drills and phillips heads. Probably has better anti corrosion qualities than silicone and its always in your "tool Box"

    Heres something if you have clean ears:

    http://stormgrounding.electrical-ins.../no-ox-id.html

    And a ground clamp that will not fail:

    http://store.electrical-insulators-a...jrd-clamp.html

    Better than exothermic welding, for the average guy.
    Last edited by ballvalve; 12-02-2010 at 11:32 AM.

  4. #49
    DIY Member jetlag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    Seen MANY panels in closets. Never saw a fire. They get a lot less water vapor than the feeder panel outside on the pole or wall. Those code panels exposed in a hall usually get a picture hung over them so they cant be located anyway.

    By the way, you already have at least one 120v circuit by using that big cable and one of the hot wires. Get rid of the 50 amp breaker and feed one wire with a 20 amp breaker at the main panel. Put a J box in the bath and hook up your 12g romex to that one wire and the ground and neutral.

    You also have the second 120v circuit by duplicating that with another 20 amp breaker at the panel and sharing the neutral, but the guys here will probably scream.

    PS: why [2] 120 v circuits for a bathtub air blower? You would also need GFCI breakers unless the tub has its own.
    Wont scream on that one but he must use a 240 volt 20 amp double breaker in the panel to feed the shared neutral multiwire branch circuit . Even though he will be connecting 2 - 120 v circuits . Set a j box in the closet to tie in the 2 #12 cables to hot tub cable , But you must leave the j box cover so it is accessable . There are exceptions to the panel in a closet , it is allowed in the cloths closet in a mobile home , it is also allowed in a closet if you can prove it is not for cloths or combustible items , but you must have proper clearance, 30 " wide and 36 " in front .
    Last edited by jetlag; 12-05-2010 at 05:52 PM.

  5. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post
    NO

    You can not put a panel in the bathroom or in a closet.
    You can not put a panel in the dwelling bathroom or in a clothes closet.


    Subtle but important difference.

  6. #51
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 220/221 View Post
    You can not put a panel in the dwelling bathroom or in a clothes closet.


    Subtle but important difference.
    Very true and thank you

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