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Thread: 220v to 110v

  1. #16
    DIY Junior Member StatManLV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    By the way, you already have at least one 120v circuit by using that big cable and one of the hot wires. Get rid of the 50 amp breaker and feed one wire with a 20 amp breaker at the main panel. Put a J box in the bath and hook up your 12g romex to that one wire and the ground and neutral.

    You also have the second 120v circuit by duplicating that with another 20 amp breaker at the panel and sharing the neutral, but the guys here will probably scream.
    Anyone else want to comment on whether or not this is a good way to accomplish my goal?

  2. #17
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StatManLV View Post
    Anyone else want to comment on whether or not this is a good way to accomplish my goal?

    If the instructions say 15 amp them a 15 amp breaker is the largest that you should use. Everything else will be okay

  3. #18
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    I service a lot of apartments where the panel is in the bathroom behind the door when it is swung open, and also closets as long as there is 3' open space in front of it.

  4. #19
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StatManLV View Post
    The tub install instructions say: "The pump and blower are designed for use with an independent 15 amp, 120V electrical power supply protected by an over current protection device rated not more than 15 Amp."
    So use 15 amp breakers on that big wire rework. You would have to clip some of the leads to get it to fit the breaker.

  5. #20
    DIY Junior Member StatManLV's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the help everyone!!!!

  6. #21
    Electrical Contractor jbfan74's Avatar
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    DO NOT CLIP ANY LEADS!
    Pigtail the correct size wire to the current wires.
    Do this on both ends to make sure the wires fit the brakers and the receptacles.
    Use a double pole 15 amp breaker or use breaker ties.
    Yes I am A Pirate-Jimmy Buffett

  7. #22
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    If its solid wire he would likely have to do that, or it might fit into certain breakers as-is.

    Seems like he should have 2 seperate breakers as he is creating 2 seperate 120v circuits.

  8. #23
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    A shared neutral circuit should have both legs turned off at the same time, thus the double breaker or the ties between them. Then, if either leg has an overload, it shuts both off. Possibly an annoyance. The way around that is a subpanel.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  9. #24
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    I suppose that eliminates any chance of some stray juice in the neutral, but a very small chance it is. Still less annoyance than adding a subpanel. Use the double breaker.

  10. #25
    Electrical Contractor sbrn33's Avatar
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    Ballvalve, You should not be giving any information on any electrical install as it is apparent that you have no electrical experience as most everything you have stated is incorrect or just down right dangerous.
    OP If that existing cable is a 4 wire you could split it up and install that proper over current protection in the existing panel. No real need to install a new panel anywhere if all you need is 2 circuits.

  11. #26
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Sounds like you didnt read the whole thread and other electricians opinions. May as well insult them by name also to be really obtuse.

    your last paragraph is what I said. What is "OP"?

    Maybe you missed page one.

  12. #27
    DIY Member arfeller's Avatar
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    "OP" usually refers to the "Original Poster" of the thread.

  13. #28
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    sbrn, still waiting on your apology! Thanks in advance.

  14. #29
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    Seen MANY panels in closets. Never saw a fire. They get a lot less water vapor than the feeder panel outside on the pole or wall. Those code panels exposed in a hall usually get a picture hung over them so they cant be located anyway.
    I can’t help how many illegal installations you have seen or how much moisture is on the outside panel I am sure that you understand that it is still illegal to install a panel in a closet and also sure that if you are truly an electrician you know the difference between the panels approved for outside installations and an inside panel.

    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    You would have to clip some of the leads to get it to fit the breaker.
    I truly hope that you didn’t say this and use the term “electrician” to describe yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    I suppose that eliminates any chance of some stray juice in the neutral, but a very small chance it is. Still less annoyance than adding a subpanel. Use the double breaker.
    Just what are you talking about here, “stray juice”?

    Quote Originally Posted by sbrn33 View Post
    Ballvalve, You should not be giving any information on any electrical install as it is apparent that you have no electrical experience as most everything you have stated is incorrect or just down right dangerous.
    OP If that existing cable is a 4 wire you could split it up and install that proper over current protection in the existing panel. No real need to install a new panel anywhere if all you need is 2 circuits.
    I agree with this post in its entirety

    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    still waiting on your apology! Thanks in advance.
    Okay here it is…”I’m sorry that you think you are an electrician”

  15. #30
    Electrical Contractor sbrn33's Avatar
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    Rock pretty much said it all. My only apology will be that I didn't get back to the forum faster and Rock beat me to it.
    Ballvalve, I will say it again, by reading your post you have proven to me(and apparently some others) that you are not an electrician. You may be a great plumber(going by your name) but that doesn't make you a good electrician. It's OK, I just don't want you giving advice that has no sound reasoning, code basis or workmanship issues.

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