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Thread: Granite backsplash to granite counter help

  1. #1
    DIY Member coopns's Avatar
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    Default Granite backsplash to granite counter help

    I have a granite backslash that matches the granite counter (vanity). I glued the granite backsplash to the wall and didn't adhere it to the counter. (I know...I know...friggin' hurrying...kids on my back). Everything is on solid but should I put a bead of clear silicone on that seam. I was concerned about water seeping through though it looks tight to the counter.

    How should I have done it?

    Please advise.

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Most people don't flood their counter, so it may not matter much. The instructions I got when installing mine from the fabricator, were to put a bead of silicon on the bottom of the backsplash, then some on the back and smush it in place. Then, take a razor blade to scrape/cut off any that oozed out so it had a nice, clean joint. Putting a bead of silicon on there now may be tough to get it to look good, but if you're really concerned, seems like the only way as it probably would tear up the wall if you tried to remove it, and you might risk cracking the piece in the process.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Member coopns's Avatar
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    So you think if will be ok without silicone? Three small children use it, and it does get a bit wet but there isn't water splashing around on the counter. I was thinking it might be difficult to get the silicone in there.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Typically, the stone is ruler straight, and the cut on the bottom of the backsplash is too, so, unless it is tipped, it is nearly a perfect connection in the first place. You won't get any into the joint, but you could put a bead at the joint. That often ends up looking funky, so, since it isn't something like a shower, I'd probably just leave it. You could try a bead of super glue, it is viscous enough where it might wick into the joint. It could stain the stone, so you'd want to try it first somewhere inconspicuous. I don't think you need to worry, as if you got enough water on there, it would likely just flow out into the room or down the sink. Just wipe up any large spills when they happen, and don't worry about it. Note, some stones can absorb moisture, and if yours can and it didn't have a sealer applied, you may want to do that. Some stone is so dense, it won't absorb a sealer, but some will suck it right up, and when wetted, change color. A sealer will help prevent things that can stain from penetrating, and will slow moisture color changes.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Member coopns's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice. I will probably just leave it.

    Not to state the obvious too much but...many times there appear to be water stains. So I am assuming it hasn't been stained. I bought it at Lowes, just go get a sealer. Any secrets to apply it?

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Not all sealers are created equal! Avoid the low end ones from Tilelab (they do make some that are decent). There are various types, too. An enhancing sealer will make the stone look like it is wet - this can bring out some of the natural colors and make it darker, but some people don't like that. I like the stuff from StoneTec, but that may be harder to find. The professional stuff costs as much as $180/gallon, but that would last you three lifetimes if not longer. Since the stone doesn't absorb much, a pint may outlast you. Actually, StoneTec may send you a sample, and that would likely be enough to do your vanity counter.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Get the kids out of the house and mask the granite splash and counter, then caulk it finely and wipe it off. Clean easy joint and no future mold and rotten cabinets.

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    DIY Member Agu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    Get the kids out of the house and mask the granite splash and counter, then caulk it finely and wipe it off. Clean easy joint and no future mold and rotten cabinets.
    I agree, masking tape it really tight to the seam, caulk it with a quality silicone, wipe it in , and remove the tape before the silicone sets up. I'm of the "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." school.

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Personally, I don't like the look of a caulked joint between the granite and the backsplash. Clear will look funky after awhile. If you can find a color matched one, that might work, but given the surface is flat, the factory cut is straight, and the two are sitting on each other, the only liquid that would get through would be by wicking, not by flowing. You'd have as much chance that it would flow off the front and sides onto the floor as trying to wick between the granite pieces and get to the wall. Now, if the vanity top isn't level, and is sloped back to the wall, I'd maybe reconsider. Wipe the counter off if it gets some standing water on it (hard with the sink and the edges open), and don't worry about it. If this was a shower, it would be a different story altogether. Does the sink have a working overflow? If so, my suggestion is leave it alone. Keep in mind that a good sealer will also help repel moisture from wicking into that tight joint.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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