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Thread: Splicing into 3" PVC horizontal drain line

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member PharmD's Avatar
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    Default Splicing into 3" PVC horizontal drain line

    Hi, just a quick question on what would be the most appropriate way to splice into an existing horizontal 3" PVC waste/drain line in my basement. I need to replace a 3"X3"X1.5" wye with a 3"X3"X2" wye (this is for the washer) There is no left or right movement to allow the new wye to slide in and be cemented. Should I use: two 3" PVC repair/slip couplings, 2 ferncos, or two banded couplings? Thanks for the help.

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    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Depending on movement allowed I would have a 1st choice of a regular pvc coupling and a shielded coupling or, a 2nd choice of 2 shielded couplings.

    Put the band on the pipe sliding it up the pipe out of the way, then put the rubber in place and roll it back over itself, put the pipe in place, roll the rubber back into place over the pipe, then put the band in place and tighten it.

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    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    I really have to wonder why plumbers have not discovered what goes on in irrigation
    pipes yet: Clamp and glue on saddle tees and y's.

    hole saw a hole in the pipe, file it and glue and clamp on the tee. About 1/8 the time spent and better than rubber rolling and grunting around trying to make it work.

    Maybe it has something to do with getting paid by the hour, unlike a farmer????

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote;
    I really have to wonder why plumbers have not discovered what goes on in irrigation
    pipes yet: Clamp and glue on saddle tees and y's.

    hole saw a hole in the pipe, file it and glue and clamp on the tee. About 1/8 the time spent and better than rubber rolling and grunting around trying to make it work.

    Maybe it has something to do with getting paid by the hour, unlike a farmer????

    We have known about saddles since the day they were invented. So have the plumbing codes and they ALL say saddles are PROHIBITED. I have never found any farmer who did not think he was an expert in EVERYTHING, which is why my dad said he almost starved to death when we lived in a farming area. That and having to take everything from a plow, to a manure spreader, to a goat in payment for work that he DID do. It took a long time before I realized why the meat locker was filled at the same time my goat "ran away".

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    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    I was talking about todays farmers. Old day farmers did'nt have PVC irrigation pipe and sprinklers, and miles of mainline, that if each 2" off shoot from a 8" mainline required a reducing tee, for perhaps 45$, they would be broke like in the old days.

    Saddle tees are strong, reliable, and easily installed. It is an artifact of ignorance if they are not allowed into the code.

    My kids eating a chicken right now that also "ran away". You had a bright dad.

    And by the way, I mean PVC saddle tees that get sanded, primed and glued and clamped with SS clamps. Better than any piece of rubber hose in my book, wrapped in SS or not.
    Last edited by ballvalve; 10-05-2010 at 07:41 PM.

  6. #6
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    Saddle tees are strong, reliable, and easily installed. It is an artifact of ignorance if they are not allowed into the code.
    Perhaps the reason they remain prohibited by code is they routinely fail in applications where they are allowed. Hence due to their unreliability they remain an illegal connection...

    To have a little extra water leak out in a farmers field is one thing....
    A few rows of crop washed out...
    A little extra soil in the runoff...

    The liability inside a home is quite a bit more and less easy to fix than pushing some dirt around in a field...

    We'll stick with abiding by our "Artifact of Ignorance" and if it is ever changed then we may or, may not decide to use them.
    Even then it will be our choice whether we meet or, exceed the code specifications.

  7. #7
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    If you mean a pressure pipe saddle tee, with a rubber washer, indeed they fail.

    Someone or some agency you know tested pvc glue-clamp saddle tees on DVW? I would like to see that report.

    What are the applications [non pressure] that you have used them in where they have failed, and in what manner?

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    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    I thought all Americans were farmers?

    Now I'm confused.

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    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    What are the applications [non pressure] that you have used them in where they have failed, and in what manner?
    Lateral connections to city sewer, roof drains...
    I didn't use them...
    I fixed them!

  10. #10
    George the Plumber Gsalet's Avatar
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    I agree two banded coupling is the way to go, Saddles are for amateurs

  11. #11
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    An amatuer would not know what a saddle tee was if it fell on him.

    So they must be made for sleazy pro's or very bright problem solvers.

    Some of these saddles are very highly engineered and as strong as a normal fitting.

    I found some old threads from here that tell me plumbers all hate them and engineers seem to love them.

    DIY guy with a saddle tee and about 15 minutes = 15$ Plumber with a few banded couplings, fighting pipe in a tight wall= $400. Thats a lot of food money in this depression.

  12. #12
    DIY Member Hillbilly Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballvalve View Post
    An amatuer would not know what a saddle tee was if it fell on him.

    So they must be made for sleazy pro's or very bright problem solvers.

    Some of these saddles are very highly engineered and as strong as a normal fitting.

    I found some old threads from here that tell me plumbers all hate them and engineers seem to love them.

    DIY guy with a saddle tee and about 15 minutes = 15$ Plumber with a few banded couplings, fighting pipe in a tight wall= $400. Thats a lot of food money in this depression.
    Ar yu an enginear? Yu shur talk lik one.
    Wun ah my kinfolk was an wuz an enginear.
    He wuz a fart smeller but twuz all book learnt an he din't ave a lick o common sense.
    Ez been all laid off now fer a good long time an he'z been buyin up my shine fer a a good long whyle...
    I do say iffen he killz offa few mora them enginear brain cellz he might start gittin smarter.
    Hillbilly Eng-in-ear
    Moonshine Maker
    Dumb as a Stump

  13. #13
    In the Trades Wally Hays's Avatar
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    You know the thread has gone south when Hillbilly gets a yearning to post
    Perception is 3/4 of reality

  14. #14
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wally Hays View Post
    You know the thread has gone south when Hillbilly gets a yearning to post
    Yes it sure is...

    I think he does have a bit of wisdom to share though...
    I bet his moonshine operation is up to code and first class with the exception of taxes...

  15. #15
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Bet his still has saddle tees all over it.

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