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Thread: crack in cast iron

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member xdeaconx's Avatar
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    Default crack in cast iron

    Hey guys,
    Well I was unlucky enough to have a crack in the drain line somewhere inside the wall. I cut out the drywall and found the problem. Pics are below.
    There are two big cracks in the bushing that is screwed into the san t (in the photo you can see my temp epoxy fix where it is). I've never seen threaded CI so i'm guessing this is galvanized? The house was built in 1929, could it have been installed this way?

    I've done some cast iron work so am familiar (mainly the main stack in the basement) with it, but have a few questions.

    - I've always used a sawsall or grinder to cut the iron. This is too tight so I'll have to go with a chain cutter, I've never used one. My concern is getting a clean cut?

    - I know they have those crap rubber san t's at the big box store, won't be going with that but can I go with ABS to replace the section to be cut out attached with mission no hub couplings, or should I go with no hub cast iron?

    - how should I (or do I need to) secure the vent to the stud?

    - What's the best plan of attack??

    thanks for all the help as always guys!
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    Last edited by xdeaconx; 10-25-2010 at 07:54 AM. Reason: additional info

  2. #2
    One who lurks Basement_Lurker's Avatar
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    You can't just cut out a vertical section of cast iron and replace it with plastic; the cast iron stack is most likely supporting its own weight, so you need to be careful how you proceed.

    If you've never use soil pipe cutters before, then you need to practice before hand! You could create a vertical crack along the pipe and create an even bigger mess, or worse yet, you could fracture the pipe and send chunks into the drain which would result in a nasty clog.

    Safest thing to do is a little more demo, or hire this out to someone more experienced.
    Broken promises don't upset me. I just think, why did they believe me? -Jack Handy


    www.blackbirdkitchenandbath.com

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member xdeaconx's Avatar
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    thanks Lurker, points well taken not using the ABS. The pipe cutters causing a bigger mess was my worry.
    by a "little more demo" do you mean open the space up more for the purpose of using a sawsall or just that it will be easier to work on with more of the stack exposed?

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    There IS threaded cast iron, but you do not have it. That is a "Tucker tee" so the pipe it is screwed to is also galvanized. There are more than one way to proceed with your repair, but I am not sure which is the best for you.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member xdeaconx's Avatar
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    so you're saying that whole section (leaded at top of the T and the small section on the bottom) is all galvanized, good to know. I've never heard of a Tucker Tee, would this be original or a repair?
    HJ, would more photos help you get a better idea of the job and how to proceed?

    thanks for all the help

  6. #6
    Master Plumber-Gas Fitter shacko's Avatar
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    >>>so you're saying that whole section (leaded at top of the T and the small section on the bottom) is all galvanized, good to know.<<<

    He is NOT saying that, only the pipe comming out the side is gavanized.

    A Tucker fitting is probably original to the install.

  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    You might be able to use hubless CI fittings, and just use the standard no-hub connecters to put back in 'normal' stuff. Out of the T, you could use a fernco donut and convert to abs or pvc depending on what's local codes and what you need. Before you make any cuts, make sure that you have anchored both the pipe above and below to ensure it doesn't move. Those horizontal runs may be all that is holding things up, and when you cut it out, it could get messy quickly.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member xdeaconx's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info Jim, anyone else have a differnt take?

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