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Thread: Constant pressure

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member jsheedy34's Avatar
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    Default Constant pressure

    I have a large house with 5 & 1/2 baths, and would like to have more and even pressure. The well is 52' deep we have a 3/4h.p. submersible pump and a large bladder tank. The pressure switch is 40/60What would your recommendations be to maintain a constant pressure of say 60 lbs. or even 70 lbs. Thanks!

  2. #2
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    I run my tank 52 to 85+ or so, for high outdoor pressure and have a pressure regulator, about 65 bucks at the house inlet. I set that at about 50 psi and never notice any pressure changes in the house. You could set 60 to 90 and try 65 at the inlet to the house.

    Valveman will fill you in on a CSV that will do about the same except with the BIG tank, you might get a lot of extra pump run time.

    You don't want your pump to cycle much and both of our methods will reduce cycling the pump during water use in your house. The CSV will be superior when you irrigate.

    Better look hard at your pump size and output. Sounds like you have a motel and 3/4 hp might not keep up with use with either of my proposals. A high pressure pump "5 or 10 gpm" so called will not give the volume, and a high output "20 or 25" gpm so called might not give the pressure you seek. You can only have it both ways with a pump DESIGNED for your pattern of use and well depth and output.
    Last edited by ballvalve; 09-12-2010 at 03:15 PM.

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    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    From that depth, a ¾ HP can deliver about 14 gallons at 60 PSI. Should be plenty unless all baths are being used at the same time. A CSV at 60 PSI would do the trick. With a large tank you still have to wait for the tank to drain from 70 to 50 before the pump will start, and then the CSV would hold at a steady 60 PSI as long as water is being used. You don’t have to wait as long for constant pressure if you use a smaller tank.

    Ballvalve, you really should try a CSV so you can get over your phobia of “extended run times”. With a big tank, you set the CSV just under the cut off setting, so it doesn’t take long to fill even a big tank. Ie; 60 PSI Cycle Stop Valve, use 43/63 pressure switch setting. This way the tank is almost full before the CSV starts topping it off at 1 GPM, and your run time is not that long. However, extending the run time some can be good for the pump. Pumps like to run and shorting the run time causes cycling.

    Widening the bandwidth of the pressure switch, such as 52/85 or 60/90 will overstretch and shorten the life of the bladder in a tank. Then using a pressure regulator after the pressure tank still lets the pump cycle on and off while you are using water. This kind of defeats one of the purposes of constant pressure, which is to keep the pump from cycling itself to death. Plus using a regulator after the pressure switch means you are always seeing the low end of the pressure. Then of course bypassing the regulator so you can have high pressure on the irrigation, also means you have to be careful to run enough water to keep the pump from cycling. You don’t have to worry about how much or how little water you are using when you have a CSV.

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    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Points well taken. I might have to try one. I am using plain tanks though, so do not have that stretch worry at most sites.

    Right now I am seeing my booster pump sycle itself to death because I have a leak somewhere within a 80' run of 1.5" pvc. Its laid about 2' deep, with electric, pumped sewage, and another water line. Paved [chipseal] drive on about a 20% slope, and the seep at the bottom. Have a photo of the install, but not much help.

    Any homespun tricks with a stethoscope for closer location? Others suggested the pro with helium. Might be cheaper to run a new line past that section. Digging a hole at the seep without a lot of hope for success.

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    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Other than you might hear air easier than water leaking, I don’t know an easy way to find the leak. I would just run another line around if I could. Where I stop patching an old line is always where the next problem starts.

  6. #6
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Good point about air, thats an easy try before the big dig or the bypass which has other unfortunate issues.

    Thanks. The Plumbing forum says Ultrasound, which many plumbers have -? never heard that one unless you are having a kid.

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member jsheedy34's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    From that depth, a ¾ HP can deliver about 14 gallons at 60 PSI. Should be plenty unless all baths are being used at the same time. A CSV at 60 PSI would do the trick. With a large tank you still have to wait for the tank to drain from 70 to 50 before the pump will start, and then the CSV would hold at a steady 60 PSI as long as water is being used. You don’t have to wait as long for constant pressure if you use a smaller tank.

    Ballvalve, you really should try a CSV so you can get over your phobia of “extended run times”. With a big tank, you set the CSV just under the cut off setting, so it doesn’t take long to fill even a big tank. Ie; 60 PSI Cycle Stop Valve, use 43/63 pressure switch setting. This way the tank is almost full before the CSV starts topping it off at 1 GPM, and your run time is not that long. However, extending the run time some can be good for the pump. Pumps like to run and shorting the run time causes cycling.

    Widening the bandwidth of the pressure switch, such as 52/85 or 60/90 will overstretch and shorten the life of the bladder in a tank. Then using a pressure regulator after the pressure tank still lets the pump cycle on and off while you are using water. This kind of defeats one of the purposes of constant pressure, which is to keep the pump from cycling itself to death. Plus using a regulator after the pressure switch means you are always seeing the low end of the pressure. Then of course bypassing the regulator so you can have high pressure on the irrigation, also means you have to be careful to run enough water to keep the pump from cycling. You don’t have to worry about how much or how little water you are using when you have a CSV.
    Thanks! valveman your info. is very helpful. Where is a source for the cycle stop valve that you would recommend?

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    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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