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Thread: Replacing Glued PVC Tee joint

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member maru3445's Avatar
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    Default Replacing Glued PVC Tee joint

    Let me preface this with that this is only the 2nd DIY job I have done in regards to plumbing, so I apologize if my terminology is incorrect.

    I recently gutted a 1/2 bath on the first floor of my house. I would like to install a pedestal sink but I have ran into a small problem, the waste line from the previous sink goes to the side wall as opposed to the rear wall. The waste line goes straight into a tee joint which in turn is connected to a vertical waste line

    What I would like to do is reroute the waste line so that it is contained in the wall but the issue is with the current tee joint/junction that is glued into the vertical waste line. I obviously cannot turn this, so what is the correct way to get a new one installed and facing the direction I need it to face?

    Thank you in advance for any help

  2. #2
    In the Trades Wally Hays's Avatar
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    Couple of things. since it's plastic hou have to cut it out top and bottom and then, remember that you need 1/4ipf of slope from the fixture to the tee inlet so you will probably have to lower it a bit or else you will run high with the lav inlet. You might be able to get enough movement out of the pipes to re-assemble with couplings or you may need a regular coupling and a repair coupling.
    Perception is 3/4 of reality

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Basically, you need to cut out the existing and install new. As noted, you want to ensure your pipe slopes down from the trap all the way to that T, and extra angles will make it harder to snake if it ever gets clogged.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    FIY. PVC and ABS plastics technically are not glued in the normal definition of the term "glued". Although each of these materials use different chemicals, the basic process is the same. The "glue" is actually not a glue but a solvent, melts the top lay of both the pipe and the fitting and when the pieces are slipped together, the two melted surfaces fuse together much the same as when metal is welded. When the solvent evaporates and hardens, the two pieces are literally one piece. This is why you can't "unglue" the joint. Now some purist will chime in and say you can separate some joints, but this is usually only on larger pieces and then it is a pry and chisel operation, and because the tolerance for fitting pieces together is so close, it is next to impossible to reuse fittings or pipe ends when this is done. PVC and ABS fit in what is termed an interference fit which means the pipe will not bottom out in the fitting without solvent. Trying to force a dry fit will make it very difficult and even impossible to separate the joint so dry fitting is not an option with plastic pipe. You just have to measure carefully and cut each piece to exact length as you progress in the assembly process. When you do apply the solvent and join the pieces together, try to rotate the connection about 1/4 turn or so then hold the joint together with your hands for a few seconds to prevent the internal pressure from forcing the joint apart. Then avoid applying torque to the joint while the rest of the assembly is done.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member maru3445's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the responses.

    After analyzing all your responses, here is what I m thinking.
    1)Cut out old joint
    2)Cut back the existing vertical pvc to allow room to install a coupling on both top and bottom
    3)attach said couplings
    4)Get new tee joint ready, by this I mean cut two small pieces of 1 1/4 pvc for both the north and south ends of the tee joint. then fuse then into the tee joint
    5)"pop" new joint into the the couplings that were installed on the vertical pvc

    does this sound right?

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote; Now some purist will chime in and say you can separate some joints, but this is usually only on larger pieces and then it is a pry and chisel operation, and because the tolerance for fitting pieces together is so close, it is next to impossible to reuse fittings or pipe ends when this is done.

    Just to correct some misinformation, I have "removed" almost EVERY sized PVC pipe from fittings AND reused the fitting with the new pipe. Whether the process is successful or not depends on your technique and experience.

  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Buying the bit to ream the sockets of a fitting that has to be turned 90-degrees doesn't seem cost effective. In this case, it would likely be more effective to cut it out and replace with new. In theory, if there was enough room, you could cut it above and below the fitting, and use either no-hub fittings or a coupling and a repair coupling. A picture would help coming up with numerous alternatives that would work.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #8
    Master Plumber-Gas Fitter shacko's Avatar
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    Have to agree with HJ, there are very few pvc fittings that can't be removed, and when you are working on a system where the fittings cost $100.00 or more you need to learn how.

  9. #9
    DIY Junior Member maru3445's Avatar
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    Here are some photos, so like I said I need to get that current fitting out and put another one in its place but turned 15 degrees to the right so I can route the waste line through the studs to the adjacent wall.

    Now in doing more research I came across some info that has me gun shy. "An additional cleanout shall be provided in a drainage line for each aggregate horizontal change of direction exceeding one hundred and thirty-five (135) degrees" -- Does this apply to what I am looking to accomplish? If I do route the waste line to the adjacent wall, I would have a 90 degree right turn from Rear wall behind the sink, and then another 90 degree turn where the rear wall and side wall meet to get the waste line into the current vertical pipe.

    Again thank you in advance for any help for 1) how to change the tee joint and 2) if I am breaking the 135 degree rule
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    Do you own a utility blade, or a keyhole saw...?

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    DIY Junior Member maru3445's Avatar
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    lol, yeah. I figured that would be pointed out. I guess that I should have put a disclaimer on those photos. Just opened/ripped it up enough to see what was going on. I will be cleaning up those cuts
    Last edited by maru3445; 09-12-2010 at 07:24 PM.

  12. #12
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    What is this secret to remove PVC from sockets that have been carefully primed and "glued"? Can you guys elaborate on the process?

  13. #13
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Ream it out with a RamBit, or equivalent. You can peel it out after making relief cuts from the inside, but that can leave a messy interior and split things if you aren't careful. The rambit cleans it out nice and smooth. One plumber I had doing some work claimed he could do it reliably some other way, but wouldn't reveal his method...no idea if he was blowing smoke, or was onto something.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  14. #14
    DIY Junior Member maru3445's Avatar
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    jadnashua, you had asked for some photos to help determine what I should do. Did the ones I provide help? I am thinking of cutting out the Tee, and then putting in the new one via a regular PVC Coupling on the south part of the stack and then a no hub coupling on the north. Thoughts?

  15. #15
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    That should work...as noted before, though, if you have too many angles, code requires a cleanout. I think you are allowed 135-degrees before a cleanout is required. the trap itself doesn't count in the angle.

    Assuming the upper section is truly just venting, and depending on the height of the sink and its depth, you might be able to put a jog in the drain and vent to move the opening where you want it.
    Last edited by jadnashua; 09-14-2010 at 11:27 AM.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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