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Thread: Trade feedback on new sump pump switch product

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member LevelGuard's Avatar
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    Question Trade feedback on new sump pump switch product

    If you were designing a new ejector pump switch, how much (height of column) water would you move? (This is serious input into product development!)

    The LevelGuard residential sump pump switch was introduced in July - yes, I work with the factory - and has sensors 6.7 inches apart to control a switch that supplies power via piggyback plug.

    If you could choose one differential for a sewage rated product, what would it be? And why?
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  2. #2
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LevelGuard View Post
    If you could choose one differential for a sewage rated product, what would it be? And why?
    It would be within one standard deviation, or less, of the average hysteresis that other manufacturers are using. The "why" is to benefit from other's mistakes and experience.

    The answer to this question should be based on science, not opinion, but that's just my opinion.

    How did you pick 6.7"? Why not 6.73", or 4", or 4.0173"?
    Choosing 6.7" implies that you already know the correct answer to within one part in 67. That's better than 2%.

    Is your post a flattery-based sales pitch disguised as a question?
    Last edited by Thatguy; 11-03-2010 at 01:07 PM.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member LevelGuard's Avatar
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    Reference to existing product was intended to demonstrate that replies would actually be used by a manufacturer. The goal is to provide a product that better serves the needs of the trade. I can remove the post and rephrase the question if you like. I'm trying to capture the voice of the customer.

    Peter Muiznieks
    Marketing Manager
    LevelGuard Fluid Control Products
    TouchSensor Technologies, LLC
    (630) 315-3900

  4. #4
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Lets hear about this switch - plenty of sales pitches going on around here anyway. [And not much else anyway]

    Its time for something other than the old floats.

    I would make a REMOTE wired "adjuster" so that a dial can set the drawdown level - start and stop. No mucking in the Sh&%^$. A LONG unit would be great in 2 or 3000 gallon storage tanks so common in western states.

    But perhaps that is beyond the residential market you might be looking at.

    So my answer is that I would not choose a fixed drawdown if I had a choice.

    I have Zoellers with floats, I would guess they run about 7" in level....

    Which is likely where you came up with the number.... so the best you can do is follow whats out there. [Likely the basins were designed to operate in that range by depth and diameter.]

    As to ideas, Perhaps a longer housing with a "slider" or 2 on the face for high and low sets.

    The pumped septic industry would be more open to a long range easily adjustable liquid level switch. With alarm contacts.

    Your biggest advantage is compactness without float bind up issues [as long as you get the INSIDES built right].
    Last edited by ballvalve; 11-04-2010 at 03:36 AM.

  5. #5
    Well Drilling/Service justwater's Avatar
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    its cool and all but.. simple float switches have been used for a long time and are a proven product. you have the ability to adjust it to whatever length you want, not to mention you can buy 3 or 4 for the price of one of those gadgets. i was thinking 50-60$ would be a little steep, but geez. there may be a place for something like this, but it looks like a tough sell to me.

  6. #6
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    A float is the best product for septic installs. Sensors have been tried a few times.
    None of them ever lasted more than a year or so.
    The ends get built up with minerals or corrode away. Some SS ones have even been eaten away by gases, and or the quality of the water itself.
    We have even tried some made out of titanium. They didn't last any longer then SS.

    If sensors are used with clean or fresh water, the life is extended by as much as 10 times.
    They are just not that reliable in a septic environment.
    "I shall never surrender or retreat" -Col. William Travis


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