(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 55

Thread: Fleck 9100 and well gpm questions

  1. #31
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob999 View Post
    It is nice that you can agree with yourself because you are the only one who sees it that way. You continue to demonstrate your ignorance about the law, state regulations, and how business does business by posting extraneous information about how states regulate motor vehicles when the subject is the sale of water softeners.
    No the subject is not the sale of softeners or regulation of motor vehicles.

    It is about whether an OEM/Distributor wholesale business also sells those same products at retail to end user/consumer customers. The business could be selling any legal products, not just softeners or their component parts.

    The physical location of the business may preclude retail sales, especially if the business originally structured itself as a non retail business. Or the building/location could be in a local government regulated nonretail area or not permitted for retail sales. Or that the business does not have a state retail sales license. It's that simple Bob.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob999 View Post
    I realize you probably aren't able to comprehend the above comments but I wanted to post them for those who can. It is unfortunate that it is not possible to have a reasonable discussion with you but you are so certain that what ever you think or believe is the righteous truth that you simply can't see that you are frequently wrong, misinformed, or simply don't understand things.
    There you are again with the personal put down Bob. How about you Report that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob999 View Post
    The current demonstration of your condition is the Clack action in telling its OEM/Distributors to stop sales to internet sellers (like you) who did not meet certain conditions. This was done pursuant to the "Control Valve Agreement" according to the Clack memo you posted. The "Control Valve Agreement" is a matter between Clack and it's OEM/Distributors.

    It is not the result of or pursuant to any state or federal law or regulation.
    I certainly didn't say it was but talk about extraneous information; what does Clack have to do with the subject? You say you have seen the Clack communications, yet you still don't understand that they stopped ALL internet sales/dealers, not some of the internet sales/dealers, all of them Bob, every one of us but...

    You will probably call this extraneous info too but for others reading this, the local, state and federal governments categorize all businesses and they also regulate all businesses. All businesses when founded must come up with a category code number and report it to local, state and federal government agencies/departments, such as IIRC the state Department of Revenue and the federal IRS; possibly the FTC also. In a quick search for business codes I found this for some retailers from
    http://www.naicscode.com/Search/More...ail.asp?N=4543

    4543 Direct Selling Establishments - 2007 NAICS Code Description See Also
    Description
    This industry group comprises establishments primarily engaged in nonstore retailing (except electronic, mail-order, or vending machine sales). These establishments typically go to the customers' location rather than the customer coming to them (e.g., door-to-door sales, home parties). Examples of establishments in this industry are home delivery newspaper routes; home delivery of heating oil, liquefied petroleum (LP) gas, and other fuels; locker meat provisioners; frozen food and freezer plan providers; coffee-break services providers; and bottled water or water softener services.

    See Also
    Parent Sectors of 4543:
    45 - Retail Trade
    454 - Nonstore Retailers
    Sub-Sectors of 4543:
    45431 - Fuel Dealers
    45439 - Other Direct Selling Establishments

    This is some wholesalers from
    http://www.naicscode.com/Search/More...110#AlsoCalled

    Description of some retailers.
    The buying of goods for resale is a characteristic of retail trade establishments that particularly distinguishes them from establishments in the agriculture, manufacturing, and construction industries. For example, farms that sell their products at or from the point of production are not classified in retail, but rather in agriculture. Similarly, establishments that both manufacture and sell their products to the general public are not classified in retail, but rather in manufacturing. However, establishments that engage in processing activities incidental to retailing are classified in retail. This includes establishments, such as optical goods stores that do in-store grinding of lenses, and meat and seafood markets.

    More descriptions of wholesalers from
    http://www.naicscode.com/Search/More...etail.asp?N=42.

    The Sector as a Whole

    The Wholesale Trade sector comprises establishments engaged in wholesaling merchandise, generally without transformation, and rendering services incidental to the sale of merchandise. The merchandise described in this sector includes the outputs of agriculture, mining, manufacturing, and certain information industries, such as publishing.

    The wholesaling process is an intermediate step in the distribution of merchandise. Wholesalers are organized to sell or arrange the purchase or sale of (a) goods for resale (i.e., goods sold to other wholesalers or retailers), (b) capital or durable nonconsumer goods, and (c) raw and intermediate materials and supplies used in production.

    Wholesalers sell merchandise to other businesses and normally operate from a warehouse or office. These warehouses and offices are characterized by having little or no display of merchandise. In addition, neither the design nor the location of the premises is intended to solicit walk-in traffic. Wholesalers do not normally use advertising directed to the general public. Customers are generally reached initially via telephone, in-person marketing, or by specialized advertising that may include Internet and other electronic means. Follow-up orders are either vendor-initiated or client-initiated, generally based on previous sales, and typically exhibit strong ties between sellers and buyers. In fact, transactions are often conducted between wholesalers and clients that have long-standing business relationships.

    This sector comprises two main types of wholesalers: merchant wholesalers that sell goods on their own account and business to business electronic markets, agents, and brokers that arrange sales and purchases for others generally for a commission or fee.

    1. Establishments that sell goods on their own account are known as wholesale merchants, distributors, jobbers, drop shippers, and import/export merchants. Also included as wholesale merchants are sales offices and sales branches (but not retail stores) maintained by manufacturing, refining, or mining enterprises apart from their plants or mines for the purpose of marketing their products. Merchant wholesale establishments typically maintain their own warehouse, where they receive and handle goods for their customers. Goods are generally sold without transformation, but may include integral functions, such as sorting, packaging, labeling, and other marketing services.
    2. Establishments arranging for the purchase or sale of goods owned by others or purchasing goods, generally on a commission basis are known as business to business electronic markets, agents and brokers, commission merchants, import/export agents and brokers, auction companies, and manufacturers' representatives. These establishments operate from offices and generally do not own or handle the goods they sell.

    Some wholesale establishments may be connected with a single manufacturer and promote and sell the particular manufacturers' products to a wide range of other wholesalers or retailers. Other wholesalers may be connected to a retail chain, or limited number of retail chains, and only provide a variety of products needed by that particular retail operation(s). These wholesalers may obtain the products from a wide range of manufacturers. Still other wholesalers may not take title to the goods, but act as agents and brokers for a commission.

    Although, in general, wholesaling normally denotes sales in large volumes, durable nonconsumer goods may be sold in single units. Sales of capital or durable nonconsumer goods used in the production of goods and services, such as farm machinery, medium and heavy duty trucks, and industrial machinery, are always included in wholesale trade.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  2. #32
    DIY Senior Member Bob999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post

    You will probably call this extraneous info too but .......... in wholesale trade.
    You are certainly correct about it being extraneous information. I think the post must be a new record for the longest extraneous post on this site.

    By the way--how long are you going to continue to say you sell Clack CS control valves? Didn't you post that you were out of that business (because Clack policies put you out of the business) as of the middle of June? Just another example of the misinformation you post.
    Last edited by Bob999; 07-05-2010 at 08:26 AM. Reason: Add information

  3. #33
    DIY Junior Member boudreaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thank you guys for the info. on the sizing, gpm, service flow, etc.

    I met with two local water treatment company over the past few days. One was a Fleck dealer the other was a Kinetico dealer. Both had 8 grains for hardness and 2-3 ppm for iron. The Fleck dealer recommended the Fleck 9500sxt with 2cuft resin for both tanks and the Kinetico dealer recommended the CP213s od which has 2.5cuft in both tanks. The Kinetico dealer also installs a sediment filter before the softener. I let them know my intentions is not to have iron stains from irrigation. They both said that they have installed many systems with the said water softeners and the draw back is the salt usage. I did ask them about the salt killing the grass, trees and shubs. One responded that it would be very minimal amounts of salt based on my hardness and iron levels and that the normal rainfall would also be diluting it. The other said I could use the pricer potassium chloride during the irrigation seasons and switch to sodium chloride during off season, but both have not seen or heard of trees or shrubs dying.

    So if we are looking just at the cuft of resin and I have a flow rate of 20.4 gpm well going thru the softener, wouldn't the Fleck 9500sxt with 2 cuft resin per tank have leakage thru it based on Bob999 8gpm/cuft or Gary Slusser's web site softener sizing info.?

    I hope to make a decision on what to do by this week. Thanks in advance to all your comments.

    Boudreaux

  4. #34
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boudreaux View Post
    I met with two local water treatment company over the past few days. One was a Fleck dealer the other was a Kinetico dealer.
    I know what you mean but for clarification, Fleck has no dealers so he is an independent dealer (the best kind).

    Quote Originally Posted by boudreaux View Post
    Both had 8 grains for hardness and 2-3 ppm for iron. The Fleck dealer recommended the Fleck 9500sxt with 2cuft resin for both tanks and the Kinetico dealer recommended the CP213s od which has 2.5cuft in both tanks. The Kinetico dealer also installs a sediment filter before the softener. I let them know my intentions is not to have iron stains from irrigation. They both said that they have installed many systems with the said water softeners and the draw back is the salt usage. I did ask them about the salt killing the grass, trees and shubs. One responded that it would be very minimal amounts of salt based on my hardness and iron levels and that the normal rainfall would also be diluting it. The other said I could use the pricer potassium chloride during the irrigation seasons and switch to sodium chloride during off season, but both have not seen or heard of trees or shrubs dying.

    So if we are looking just at the cuft of resin and I have a flow rate of 20.4 gpm well going thru the softener, wouldn't the Fleck 9500sxt with 2 cuft resin per tank have leakage thru it based on Bob999 8gpm/cuft or Gary Slusser's web site softener sizing info.?
    The 2.0' has a 12 gpm constant SFR and the 2.5 has 18 gpm. And IMO you need more resin for a peak demand of 20+ gpm; especially with 3 ppm of iron.

    The Kinetico OD means you get water through both tanks until one tank goes into regeneration, which is always while you are using water. So, the Kinetico is over sized on one end but undersized when a tank regenerates plus... the drain line flow gpm is subtracted from the SFR of the single tank that you get water from until the regeneration is finished. Of course the prefilter has a pressure loss, that increases the more water run through it and at 20 gpm and 3 ppm iron it won't take long, so both figures will be somewhat reduced and you won't like the frequency o cartridge replacement irrigation will cause; or the cost of that unless you buy cartridges by the case.

    I would not go with Kinetico for a number of reasons like their prefilter requirement, the expense and being proprietary/only one dealer for parts and service.

    BTW, if you had sufficient rain to flush the sodium down past the plant roots, you wouldn't be irrigating, right? [/QUOTE]
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  5. #35
    DIY Senior Member Bob999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    448

    Default

    I don't recommend using softened water for irrigation. I believe it will cause damage to your plants/grass over time. I think you should go with an iron filter for irrigation only where staining is an issue. If your pH is low it is possible that an acid neutralizing filter would remove enough iron that staining would not be a significant problem. Altermatively a greensand plus filter, as an example, could be used--and use untreated water in areas where staining is not an issue. Another approach would be to use drip irrigation for plants in areas where staining is an issue.

    As to the size of resin tanks I think 2 cubic foot is two small--if you really want to size the system based on a flow of 20+ gpm I recommd a 3 cubic foot tank (per tank if a two tank system).

    The Kinetco OD system uses both tanks at the same tank during peak flows but for prolonged usage will almost certainly go into regeneration and then your usable flow will be dramatically reduced. I think you would be much better off with the Fleck 9500 for a design flow rate of 20+ gpm.

  6. #36
    DIY Junior Member boudreaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thank you Gary Slusser and Bob999 for taking the time to reply back.

    You both have confirmed my concerns with the undersized resin tanks, but did not realize that the Kinetico would have the pressure loss issue. I was already leaning towards the Kinetico model as it was 0.5cuft greater in each tank plus it was considerably priced less than the Fleck. That puts a halt in the decision process as they were the two local water treatment company.

    Bob999, thanks for the info on the iron filter. Both water treatment company did not recommend it as the pH was on the acidic side ~6.5 to 6.75 and that the backwash gpm needed would be greater than the gpm I would get through the tanks for the irrigation application.

    The irrigation will be separated into 2 zones, treated and untreated. Definitely going with the KCL for the Spring to Fall seasons and switch back to NaCL during the winter. To much time has been invested into the landscape and hardscape. I can't accept the iron stains.

    Thanks again,
    Boudreaux

  7. #37
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    You want to be careful with Bob's advice here. You don't need an AN filter and if you got one large enough for 20+ gpm SFR, your pump and possibly the well probably couldn't backwash it. And if you treated half of your 20 gpm with one you may not be able to successfully backwash it either.

    The 9500 and its meter makes for an expensive control valve. How much does Kinetico and the independent guy want for their equipment?

    Did the guy with the 9500 suggest it or did you mention a 9500 and then he proposed it? See I do not agree that you need a 9500. Bob does not know how to read a control vale spec sheet.

    You should look into a polyphosphate feeder for just the irrigation water of the zone you want to treat. I would not use it on the house water; then I would use a softener for the house.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  8. #38
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob999 View Post
    You are certainly correct about it being extraneous information. I think the post must be a new record for the longest extraneous post on this site.
    Yeah I know, I proved you wrong and now you can't bring yourself to admit it and you change the subject.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob999 View Post
    By the way--how long are you going to continue to say you sell Clack CS control valves? Didn't you post that you were out of that business (because Clack policies put you out of the business) as of the middle of June? Just another example of the misinformation you post.
    Yes I am essentially out of business except for a stash of Clack WS1 valves I have under the bed. I may be planning to get more too, is that OK with you? So Bob no misinformation, simply put, you are wrong again as you were about wholesalers selling retail and proposing that boudreaux uses an AN filter for his iron problem in his irrigation water. And that he needs a 9500 valve. The list keeps getting biger'n bigger Bob....
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  9. #39
    DIY Senior Member Bob999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    So Bob no misinformation, simply put, you are wrong again as you were about wholesalers selling retail and proposing that boudreaux uses an AN filter for his iron problem in his irrigation water. And that he needs a 9500 valve. The list keeps getting biger'n bigger Bob....
    Actually you were the one who suggested the 9500 valve:

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    Then if the 9100 is not the right choice you go to the 9500 etc. bUT....
    As to your (incorrect) statement that I proposed the use of an AN filter--what I actually said was:

    " If your pH is low it is possible that an acid neutralizing filter would remove enough iron that staining would not be a significant problem." and I further said:

    "I think you should go with an iron filter for irrigation only where staining is an issue."

    As to your (incorrect) characterization "about wholesalers selling retail " I challenge you to provide the specific citation of what I posted along with how you believe it is wrong. I believe my posts have been correct and you are simply huffin and puffin as usual.

  10. #40
    DIY Senior Member Bob999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boudreaux View Post
    Bob999, thanks for the info on the iron filter. Both water treatment company did not recommend it as the pH was on the acidic side ~6.5 to 6.75 and that the backwash gpm needed would be greater than the gpm I would get through the tanks for the irrigation application.

    The irrigation will be separated into 2 zones, treated and untreated. Definitely going with the KCL for the Spring to Fall seasons and switch back to NaCL during the winter. To much time has been invested into the landscape and hardscape. I can't accept the iron stains.

    Thanks again,
    Boudreaux
    If you are separating the irrigation into two zones does the treated zone need to be 20+ gpm or will a lesser flow suffice? With lesser flow in the treated zone the feasible treatment options increase.

    If you decide to continue with the Fleck 9500 and want to consider DIY you can buy one online.

    Here is one source:

    http://www.ohiopurewaterco.com/shop/...me.php?cat=377

    If you have copper pipes I recommend you install an AN filter for your domestic water--the acidity levels you are reporting will degrade copper pipes over time.
    Last edited by Bob999; 07-06-2010 at 09:01 AM. Reason: Add info

  11. #41
    DIY Junior Member boudreaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks again Gary Slusser and Bob999 for replying.

    Gary, the company offering the Fleck 9500 had suggested the 9500 based on the information I had told him as far as the flow rate based on the water collected and time the pump turned on and off as well as the well drill log sheet that I picked up from the township. Prior to meeting any water treatment company, I had originally thought about getting the Fleck 9100 with a 4cuft per resin tank and posted my question about flow rate and about the 16gpm I saw on a internet store for the 9100. Now I know it is more than just the flow rate of the control valve but also the amount of resin needed.

    I don't feel comfortable posting the actual price quoted between the Kinetico CP and the Fleck 9500, but the price difference installed was a little over 2k. That was one of the reason why I was leaning towards the Kinetico, plus it had 0.5cuft extra per resin tank. I actually have a friend in Florida that has that phosphate injection system for his irrigation. I remember seeing the plastic tank. It definitely made a noticeable difference but you could see a lighter iron stains compared to his neighbors around the development that I believe had no treatment at all. I do not know what his iron level is but the stains around the development were a really dark brown tint on the trees, driveways, house.

    Bob999, the reason why I believe I need the 20+ gpm treated because the sprinkler company told me that they will run the zones in order to keep the well pump running all the time without turning off. They will also be increasing the pressure switch setting as he needs at a minimum 25psi at the sprinkler. Currently it is set at 40/60. Thanks for the link on the Ohio Pure. Its quite the price difference compared to the local quote I got. I always support local business as much as possible especially when I can get support if things go astray. But then again, the price difference is tough to swallow. I'm going to take a drive and see if I can find a neighbor with sprinklers running without stains and see which water treatment company he/she used to get another quote locally.

    Thanks again Gary Slusser and Bob999 for your replies.

    Boudreaux

  12. #42
    DIY Senior Member Bob999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boudreaux View Post
    Bob999, the reason why I believe I need the 20+ gpm treated because the sprinkler company told me that they will run the zones in order to keep the well pump running all the time without turning off. They will also be increasing the pressure switch setting as he needs at a minimum 25psi at the sprinkler. Currently it is set at 40/60.
    Avoiding pump cycling is an important consideration. However there is another approach that is discussed extensively in the well and pump forum on this site--that is installing a Cycle Stop Valve (CSV).

    I suggest you browse some of the info. Start here:

    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...-or-CP-Systems

  13. #43
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob999 View Post
    boudreaux:

    Not withstanding all the bickering with Slusser I just want to be clear with you that it is my opinion that if you want to treat 20+ gpm with a softener the Fleck 9100 valve will not provide satisfactory service because of the relatively small size of the passages in the valve which will result in excessive pressure drop through the valve.

    One approach you might consider for a flow of 20+ gpm would be to install 2 Fleck 9100 systems in parallel. This would substantially reduce the equipment cost and provide satisfactory flow/pressure drop for 20 gpm flow.
    I just last night watched a webinar from Fleck about control valves.

    The guy got into data on spec sheets and mentioned something you have never mentioned yet Bob; as if it isn't on the spec sheet....

    When you figure out what that is, get back to me about a 9100 (which is full 1" ported BTW) on 3-4 cuft tanks not being the right choice for this application Bob. My 23+ years experience in selling and servicing softeners, including twin tanks with a Fleck 9000/9100 control valves says it is.

    Now you're suggesting two 9100s, that is a very bad idea because it is not necessary and just adds to the cost.
    Last edited by Gary Slusser; 07-07-2010 at 09:57 AM. Reason: Bob added info in bold
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  14. #44
    DIY Senior Member Bob999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post

    The 2.0' has a 12 gpm constant SFR and the 2.5 has 18 gpm. And IMO you need more resin for a peak demand of 20+ gpm; especially with 3 ppm of iron.
    And then on his website Slusser says the following about SFR (Slusser Flow Rating):

    "The constant SFR gpm of most softeners is: 1.0' cuft = 9, 1.25' = 10, 1.5' = 12, 2.0' = 13, 2.5' = 18, 3.0' = 20, 3.5' = 22 gpm, 4.0 = 25 etc.. "

    So the bottom line is he is just picking numbers out of the air and posting whatever comes to his mind at the moment. There is no ryhme or reason to the figures he spouts.

  15. #45
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob999 View Post
    And then on his website Slusser says the following about SFR (Slusser Flow Rating):

    "The constant SFR gpm of most softeners is: 1.0' cuft = 9, 1.25' = 10, 1.5' = 12, 2.0' = 13, 2.5' = 18, 3.0' = 20, 3.5' = 22 gpm, 4.0 = 25 etc.. "

    So the bottom line is he is just picking numbers out of the air and posting whatever comes to his mind at the moment. There is no ryhme or reason to the figures he spouts.
    Yes those figures are accurate.

    No, I didn't pull them out of the air, I could post the data Bob but then you'd question where it's from and who says so etc. etc. "that's not what Purolite says" as you have done in the past but, where do you come up with your 8 gpm/cuft of resin Bob, no one anywhere agrees with you? But then you have improved because not too long ago you were saying a maximum of 5 gpg/cuft.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

Similar Threads

  1. Dialing in my Fleck
    By chase237 in forum Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and reviews
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-12-2010, 09:16 AM
  2. Fleck 9100 Metered Twin Tank Water Softener - 24,000 Grain
    By bluinc in forum Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and reviews
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-12-2009, 02:55 PM
  3. Fleck 5600
    By CD King in forum Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and reviews
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-14-2009, 07:47 PM
  4. Fleck 5600sxt
    By hotrodjohn in forum Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and reviews
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-21-2009, 02:55 PM
  5. Fleck 5600
    By jjamison in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-08-2007, 04:53 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •