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Thread: Plastic Pipe Insulators / Brackets thru Studs for Copper Pipe -- When Required?

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    DIY Senior Member speede541's Avatar
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    Default Plastic Pipe Insulators / Brackets thru Studs for Copper Pipe -- When Required?

    I'm installing copper water lines, and I've noticed that the plumber who worked on other parts of my remodel used polyethylene "tube insulators" (as pictured below) in some instances, but not all.

    Is there a general rule of thumb when these should be used? Are they ever required?

    For instance, when running copper through a series of studs, would it be advisable to use one on each end? On every stud? Every third? Etc...

    I really can't determine any rhyme or reason or pattern to what the plumber before me did.

    For reference, here's the IPS version of the insulator I'm looking at:
    http://www.ipscorp.com/watertite/pip...pipeinsulators


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    DIY Junior Member moserro's Avatar
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    I'm not an expert, but my understanding is those brackets are just used to limit vibrations in areas where there are fast acting valves (like near a washing machine), or where the pipe runs through studs/joists and vibration can occur. Just use your discretion. If you think the pipe has a chance of vibrating and causing unwanted noise, use the insulator.

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    In the Trades Wally Hays's Avatar
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    we use them for any penetration through studs ( especially metal studs ) to stop noise and limit abrasion to the pipe.
    Perception is 3/4 of reality

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    You don't need to support copper every 16".
    You can skip studs. However many plumbers bang them in anyway.
    If the holes are all in a straight line, then the skipped insulators aren't needed.

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    In the Trades Wally Hays's Avatar
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    A lot of plumbers don't use them at all, but I don't like those creeping pipe callbacks. I would put them in the one of the best inventions of the past 50 years catagory.
    Perception is 3/4 of reality

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    Master Plumber-Gas Fitter shacko's Avatar
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    Agree with (Wally Hays ), if you can get them in use on ever hole.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    I usually only use those is metal studs. For wood, I use the ones which have a "flange" with two screw/nail holes in them.

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    In the Trades Wally Hays's Avatar
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    we call dem one Mickey Mouse ears
    Perception is 3/4 of reality

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    that works.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    The more places you attach a pipe to the framing, the louder it gets.
    I don't use them on every hole for that reason. It's not to be cheap.
    It's noise prevention.

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    DIY Senior Member speede541's Avatar
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    Thanks, gents. So I scattered 'em around to a handful of locations where I thought made sense, and will continue with that approach. Still can't make sense out of the what/where/why my plumber did before me, but oh well.

    The screw holes seem superfluous since I have to pry these with a screwdriver to remove them, but since they're there, I guess I can burn a few more pennies driving anchors.

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    DIY Senior Member speede541's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    The more places you attach a pipe to the framing, the louder it gets.
    I don't use them on every hole for that reason. It's not to be cheap.
    It's noise prevention.
    Ah! So do you drill oversized holes through all the studs so the pipe makes zero contact, except for the holes which have an insulator?

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    DIY Senior Member DavidTu's Avatar
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    Would one use these with PEX tubing as well? Any guidelines for PEX that differs from that given above for Copper?

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    The plastic insulations work well on PEX. The exterior dimensions for PEX can Copper are the same.

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    DIY Senior Member DavidTu's Avatar
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    So in summary, it sounds like the concensus is to use some sort of pipe insulator on ALL lines (not just fast-acting values) and to place either every stud/joist or every other. Yes?

    Now to go slightly off topic... For floor penetrations, Uponor has a 1/2" metal straight-through support. Is that to be used on ALL lines as well? What exactly does this protect against? (It being metal it seems it would not be for movement as I presume it would chafe.) Is this installed on top of the sole/bottom plate of a wall or where?

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