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Thread: Upstairs shower drains in lower shower

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member ginnifer's Avatar
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    Default Upstairs shower drains in lower shower

    Help..I need help... My plumbing problem is....The upstairs shower is draining in the downstairs shower as well as the toliet. What a mess I have. I would like to know how to unclog? Where do I start with my drain cleaner? Do I start in the downstairs shower drain? Do I go through the vent on the roof. I have a new heavy duty snake the cable is 100ft, I am sure this is exactly what I need to fix this problem. I will be grateful for any suggestions that will help me unclog this drain.
    Thank you for your time,
    Jennifer

  2. #2
    DIY Member tregg's Avatar
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    I don't know what to do about your problem but what stands out to me is why there are no replies! It's two months later and no replies! Any female who posts something usually has lots of hits! Puzzled? Can we get together and talk this over?
    Last edited by tregg; 06-27-2010 at 02:54 PM.

  3. #3
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    This is the first time I have seen this person's problem. I am not sure why they have a 100' cable if they have absolutely no knowledge of how to use it. This is a case where "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing", because if they have the proper cable, it can break fingers, wrists, or arms, and it can also kill as a cursory search of the Internet can prove to you.

  4. #4
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    My wife always reminds me that, "You can do a don't", but hear goes anyway. The first thing you do with a clogged is DO NOT use chemicals. A clogged drain needs to professionally snaked. As HJ points out, a DIY snake of sufficient size and strength to clear a drain can be a very dangerous tool in the hands of an inexperienced homeowner. Sometimes folks pose a question on this forum and are told the best thing to do is hire a professional plumber, and then they get in a huff and point out that this is a forum for DIY. Well, it is, but the best advice to give a DIY is not to mess with the problem. This doesn't just apply to a plumbing forum, but to virtually everything we encounter in everyday life. Medical problems, electrical problems, repairs in other than plumbing areas, just to name a few. I find it hard to believe that this question was posed to this forum and not answered, but I suppose it is possible.

  5. #5
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Well I certainly hope she has called a pro by now...

    I never noticed this before...

  6. #6
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    If the main line is backing up, it could be roots in the line.

    When a cutter encounters the roots, it can catch, and the cable can start twisting very quickly. If the person operating the snake doesn't pull back quick enough on the cable, it car wrap the person up.

    As a plumber, I've only operated a power snake a little bit. The last time it broke the watch on my wrist and I had the customer unwind me from the cable.
    I went back to the shop, and one of the other guys, Gary showed me his thumb that he could bend back to touch his arm.
    A snake had destroyed the tendon operating his thumb.
    But neither of us died. It does happen though, So frankly we don't encourage homeowners to rent this type of equipment. It's like putting your head in a brush shredder if you don't know exactly what you are doing.
    This is the type of tool that they let stupid men run, but OSHA would have a fit if a woman touched one. They are very dangerous.
    I remember checking to see how much you got for a missing hand, $10,000
    I think a hand is worth a lot more then that.
    I hired one guy to work on my home, he has been a construction worker pouring concrete for one of the big hydro dams in the State of Washington. The guy next to him fell into the form as they were pouring concrete. He quickly yelled for them to stop, but was ordered to keep pouring concrete. There are some things that are very serious. The pay is good for the hazard jobs, but you will get hurt. That part is guaranteed.
    Last edited by Terry; 06-28-2010 at 08:45 AM.

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