(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 24 of 24

Thread: What is your favorite interior latex paint?

  1. #16
    Engineer chassis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    339

    Default

    Just got done painting the master bath walls. I found that using a fair amount of paint on a 3" brush will give you a nice line at the ceiling/wall because the paint flows slightly ahead and above the brush.

    Also used the Klean Strip Roller and Brush Cleaner. It works great. It removed dried-on latex paint on my 3" brush that I thought would never come off. It smells like acetone, and is a dark yellow color. First I washed the brush with water and dish soap, then wrung out the water. Then poured the Klean Strip over the bush and worked out the paint with paper towels, repeat 3 times. Then wash again with soap and water to get the solvent and gummed up paint out of the brush. Brush came out looking almost like new.

  2. #17

    Default

    I expect you need a steadier hand than I have to use a brush at the ceiling line. I used only a brush when I first started painting so I know it can be done. The tool just seems so much quicker for me. That is what most customers see first so it has to look good. I can usually tell the expertise of a painter just by looking at that line. Yes, Klean-strip does the job, even on paint that's been on a while.

  3. #18
    Engineer chassis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    339

    Default

    Found some good articles on Purdy's website: http://www.purdycorp.com/pro/paintcorner

    Would like to spray paint my heat registers with the same latex paint I am using for the master bath walls. It is Sherwin-Williams "Oriel Gray". It is a flat eg-shell latex paint. What are the chances my local paint store can put this paint into an aerosol spray can for me?

    My other option is to use my Wagner power painter, but would have to do this outside, less convenient, etc.

  4. #19
    DIY Member teamo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    95

    Default

    I bought a brush spinner to use on my good brushes. It clamps onto the handle and spins the brush at high speed in a bucket to get it dried quicker then you just comb out the brush and let it dry out. I like the purdy brushes that the others mentioned here also.

  5. #20
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,328

    Default

    Chalk up another for the Purdy.

    I clean latex paint off my brushes and rollers with plain water and then do a little soaking in mineral spirits. I find its good for accumulating all of the 'watered down paint' at the bottom of the jar and really cleans out the brushes. Does a good job on almost clean paint trays too, swish a little around and pour out the paint w/ it. After soaking, rinse out w/ water. Works for me.

    Jason

  6. #21
    Engineer chassis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    339

    Default

    Stopped by the local Harbor Freight and picked up one of the pump pressurized aerosol cans. Had mixed success spraying the electrical switchplates and a/c register. Tried spraying the latex and while it did spray, it was not atomized very well. Paint was thinned pretty well (I thought) with water. Next time I'll thin it further. Can you thin latex with mineral spirits?

    During cleanup I sprayed mineral spirits through the mechanism and the spirits atomized very well. Seems like the solution is to get my paint color from Sherwin-Williams in an oil base, then thin it down with spirits or turpentine and spray it that way.

    Of course the *real* solution is a big compressor and an HVLP gun, but for spraying a dozen switchplates per year, don't think the wife will go for that one.

  7. #22
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,328

    Default

    Sometimes you can find automotive touch up aerasol paint cans that closely match your wall color. Costs like $4/ea and should do all you need.

    Jason

  8. #23
    DIY Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    College place
    Posts
    3

    Default Wrap first, then hang brushes to dry

    After the brush is clean, I wrap it in a paper towel, securing it with a rubber band at the butt so the rubber band doesn't crush the bristles. If the bristles have 'flared' from improper use or storage, this will bring the bristles back under control when they are dry.

    I drill holes in the handles of all my paint brushes so I can hang them when they're ready to dry (after I've wrapped them in a paper towel). If there's any paint left in the brush, it will drain down to the tips of the bristles and drip off, instead of accumulating in the butt of the brush. (If you lay brushes flat to dry, the paint will go back into the butt of the brush, which makes the flexible part of the bristles progressively shorter.) If I don't have a nail handy to hang them from, I put a 'twistie' through the handle to make a loop, and hang it from a handle on a cupboard, or tie it to a door handle or something similar so it can hang down.

  9. #24
    DIY Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    College place
    Posts
    3

    Default PREVAL Sprayer for Spraying Registers, other small items

    The best sprayer I've found for small items such as metal registers & light fixtures is PREVAL (brand) Sprayer. Available at paint stores, it's a little 4-oz CO2 cartridge that screws onto a small reusable glass bottle. You can buy the whole kit (cartridge and jar), or just the cartridge. You really only need 1 jar unless you're going to work on several projects at once.

    There's a chart included that shows how much to thin different paints, i.e. varnish, oil base, latex. I've used them all, followed their proportions, and had terrific success. I even sprayed PVC louvers on vertical blinds to match the trim around my windows. Talk about custom made!! One of my greatest successes was a very basic ceiling fan -- I sprayed the entire ceiling fan (disassembled, of course) to match the ceiling -- it just fades away into the ceiling but adds a little class up there, ever so subtly. Fun.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •