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Thread: Need Quick Answer, Inspector Coming Monday!

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member sykotek's Avatar
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    Exclamation Need Quick Answer, Inspector Coming Monday!

    I'm running a 30A line out from my garage (where main panel is) to a shed, 52 feet.

    I have spoken to the insoector earlier in the week and was told I can use UF-B direct bury cable at 24" which is what I am doing. I am running UF-B 10/2 with ground, just some sockets and lights, small tools, etc.

    I have all of the materials and am trenching it tomorrow, inspector is coming Monday to check the trench and cable before I make the rest of the runs in the shed.

    My questions are:

    1. Can I run the UF-B directly from the 30A breaker in my main panel, thru the crawlspace to the corner of the house, then out down the foundation direcly, or do I need a junction box of some sort where it leaves the house?

    2. Also, is there typically any requirement to put the UF-B in conduit of some type between the point it leaves the house and the point it enters the ground?

    Same questions for the shed side. I understand that local codes vary, I'm just asking 'in general' since I can't get a specific answer at the moment!

    Please answer if you can, I left a voicemail for the inspector yesterday, never heard back, and called today to find out he is out on vaction until Monday. I am doing all the work for the trench inspection tomorrow.

    Thanks!!!!

  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    If it is exposed you need to put it inside conduit. That will usually mean you need a J-box, or "pull ell" where you turn the corner to go downward.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member sykotek's Avatar
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    Thank you! So I'll plan on putting a J box on the side of the house and conduit to the ground. The shed is raised off the ground and I plan on coming up under the wall sill plate vertically so am assuming I can just place conduit from ground level (or a few inches down) to the underside of the floor there up through into the shed a few inches.

    Anything else I am leaving out off the top of your head? I'm reading thru the forums here picking up pointers. I've done plenty of wiring but this is the first time I am #1 doing exterior wiring and #2 adding a small subpanel.

    My plan is to run a 30A single pole breaker to the UF-B, then out to the shed where it will attach to a small Homeline panel. Since this will only be 110/120 I picked up 10/2 UF-B, but I saw somewhere posted here that 10/3 is required to run to a subpanel. I'm again assuming that is only the case if I am bringing 220 out to the subpanel. Correct?

    Other thoughts?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by sykotek; 04-30-2010 at 10:56 AM.

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Many panels expect 240vac input, even if you aren't using 240 anywhere. Depends on how the bus bars are set up. If you only run 120vac to it, in some panels, you'll run into problems. If in fact it is only set up for 120, you'd be okay. If you run 240, with the same wire (although you'd need three wires plus ground) you'd have more current available. A subpanel needs hot(s), neutral, and ground. And, the ground and neutral bus should be separated.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member sykotek's Avatar
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    I'll talk to the inspector then, if he lets me use the two insulated conductors in the 10/2 for the hots and the bare for neutral, then I'll just install a grounding rod out at the shed and run 220 to the panel. If not, then I'm not paying another $100 for a run of 10/3 for 220 to run some shop lights and a fan...... absolutely no need for 220 unless there is $0.00 additional cost, like I said I have all the materials already and do not want to have to go out shopping again.

    Thanks for the replies so far!

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    NO, you can't use the bare ground lead as neutral! You need two hots, neutral, AND a ground lead all the way back to the main panel, you can't use a ground stake as a substitute.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    If you are installing a subpanel Jim is correct. In addition, 2 ground rods will be required at the outbuilding.

    If you want to go cheap you can install 1- 20 amp circuit which must have an on-off switch in the outbuilding. Anything else will require a subpanel.

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Just as long as you realize that a 110/120 v. supply to the panel could restrict your usage, depending on what you plan to use in the building.

  9. #9
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Just curious. WHY did you buy the 10/2 in the first place???
    Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.

  10. #10

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    Avoid complications.

    Skip the panel.


    Use the #10 wire on a 20 amp breaker and #12 wire inside the shed for the receps and lights.


    The exposed portion of Uf cable need to be protected (conduit) "where subject to physical damage" but that is very subjective. Only your inspector can tell you.

  11. #11
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    If it is exposed going down a foundation into the ground, it IS subject to physical damage. All kinds of things could happen to it to damage the wire. A hungry rabbit might be one of them.

  12. #12

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    If it is exposed going down a foundation into the ground, it IS subject to physical damage
    That's your opinion as well as mine, but I know there are areas where they allow the freaking unfused service conductor cable to be tacked to the side of a building.

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