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Thread: Can Monoflow tees lie flat to floor joist or hang below

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  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member jasonnewyork's Avatar
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    Default Can Monoflow tees lie flat to floor joist or hang below

    This is a followup post to an old thread of mine. Special thanks to hj and johnjh2o1 for steering me in the right direction. To make a long story short, I'm restoring a Monoflow system in my house. I contacted B&G and one of their engineering reps helped me calculate pipe size, pumps, etc. I purchased all the materials and would like to start the project soon as the weather is no longer cold in New York.

    Link to old post: http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...ema&highlight=

    I have one remaining issue that bothers me and I wanted to run by you guys.

    Since I'm finishing this basement, I would like to run all the pipes flush against the floor joists above. In order to do this, I would have to run the main along the bottom of the beams and the Monoflow tees would be horizontal (0 degrees) with riser pipes flush as well.

    In all the homes I've been in with Monoflow, the main always hangs down maybe 6-9" and the tees are angled at 45 degrees. I was told this is done to purge air from the risers as gravity forces the water down and the air up. Is this true? Would it be OK for me to plum with tees at 0 degrees? The engineering rep for B&G said this doesn't matter but I value your opinion.

    Thanks again.
    Last edited by jasonnewyork; 04-27-2010 at 09:35 AM.

  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The function of a MonoFlo tee is in its construction. It can lie in any orientation. In fact, they point downwards for basement radiators. As far as air is concerned, it should be evacuated at the boiler, and NOT get to the radiation, but if it should it will still rise to the highest point in the system. I assume they gave you the parameters for the distance between the MonoFlo tee and the "return" tee from the radiator, and if you have any basement radiators, you need TWO MonoFlo tees.

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    DIY Junior Member jasonnewyork's Avatar
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    OK, thanks hj. I'm only using the monoflow loop above the main. The basement will be on a separate pumped zone with baseboards.

    They did give me parameters for the distance of the tees - 6x pipe diameter min between the tees and corners. In my case, I'm using 1" pipe, so tees spaced 6" apart min or 6" from a corner.

    I was planning on spacing the tees the width of the radiator when possilbe. They said this would be more ideal than the 6" minimum. Do you agree?

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    In the Trades Wally Hays's Avatar
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    We always tried to space them at least 18" from each other. Was there any particular reason why you are resurecting the monoflow system? Not that it's a bad thing, but there is a tremendous resistance to flow within the system and that's why you need to run a fairly large main which, naturally the bigger the pipe, the more expensive it is. If it were me, I would pipe 5/8 heat pex to all of the radiators and bring them back individually to manifolds at the boiler. From there you can either use separate thermostatic radiator valves to control heat or put several radiators on thier own circulators or zone valves.
    Perception is 3/4 of reality

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    DIY Junior Member jasonnewyork's Avatar
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    Wally - please read my original post, link at top of page. The manifold setup was something I considered. I ruled it out because too complicated with pipes everywhere and difficult to equalize the flow to radaitors far and near the manifold. I think that setup works best with radaint. The only other viable option was a 2 pipe reverse return but that uses twice the pipe. Since I'm doing myself, the cost of materials is 2-3x less than what a professional would charge so I'm OK with added cost of a copper monoflow setup.

    I received lots of good advice from this forum as well as my local B&G rep. I will highly recommend calling the manufacturers, either a homeowner or pro, they provide a tremendous resource for free. In return for their support, I purchased all B&G products.
    Thanks Wally

  6. #6
    In the Trades Wally Hays's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=jasonnewyork;256531]Wally - please read my original post, link at top of page. The manifold setup was something I considered. I ruled it out because too complicated with pipes everywhere and difficult to equalize the flow to radaitors far and near the manifold. I think that setup works best with radaint. The only other viable option was a 2 pipe reverse return but that uses twice the pipe. Since I'm doing myself, the cost of materials is 2-3x less than what a professional would charge so I'm OK with added cost of a copper monoflow setup.

    There are more pipes but they are smaller and flexible and can be run up inside the floor joists instead of hanging down below them. Balancing is not a problem and for that matter you don't need to balance anything, they will all heat up at about the same rate. You can use thermostatic radiator valves at the radiators if you want to. My own house has 18 cast iron radiators , all piped with 5/8 heat pex to manifolds at the boiler. No balancing valves and no radiator valves. The whole system heats evenly. Nobody has done a mono flow system in 30 years except for repair work. I can't believe your B&G rep would even consider recommending that you go mono flow unless he needs the commission. Head on over to www.heatinghelp.com and post your idea on the wall over there. I doubt anybody will give you a thumbs up.
    Last edited by Wally Hays; 04-29-2010 at 07:02 PM.
    Perception is 3/4 of reality

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