(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Adding switched receptacle

  1. #1
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default Adding switched receptacle

    I have a switched duplex receptacle that has a black and white wire connected to it. It seems that if I want to add another switched receptacle across the room, all I would need to do is connect another run of 2-wire to this receptacle and the 2nd would be switched as well. Is this the correct way to do it? Thanks for your help.
    Neil

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,412

    Default

    That would be one way to do it. It depends on where the switch is in relation to the currently switched receptacle whether it is easier to run it from the switch or the receptacle.

    Most of the time, half of the receptacle is switched, and the other half is powered constantly, but it doesn't have to be done that way - both could be switched. If they are separate, then one or both of the tabs would be broken so each could be controlled independently.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    It'll be much easier to run from the existing receptacle. If I get this right, the black wire I have now is part of the switch loop so I can't have one outlet hot and one switched, but that's okay.

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,412

    Default

    Yes, if both of the tabs are intact, and there's only black/white (and ground, I assume), then there's only the switched power available there. You'd need at least three wires there to have one always hot. If they used that box as a junction, there might be a hot burried in the back of the box you could use.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    No ground wires in the original circuits in this house, unfortunately. GFCI at the panel.

  6. #6
    Electrical Contractor Jim Port's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    156

    Default

    Without a ground the circuit should not be extended.

  7. #7
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Even with the GFCI protecting the circuit?

  8. #8
    Electrical Contractor jbfan74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Newnan, GA
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Correct!
    2 wire circuits are not allowed to be extended.
    Yes I am A Pirate-Jimmy Buffett

  9. #9

    Default

    But don't lose any sleep over it.

  10. #10
    DIY Member Bassman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Not a wink.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •