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Thread: Trench for Sewer Line

  1. #1
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    Default Trench for Sewer Line

    I'm have the sewer line being replaced on Tuesday. The line is about 9 ft-10ft down. I've rented a sod cutter in an attempt at not losing large parts of the front lawn. I think the guy said the trench has to be about 4ft wide since he has to use a trench box bc of the depth.

    My question is how much SOD would you guys say I should cut on either side? I'm guessing there will be lots of dirt that needs to be piled somewhere.

    I have about 65-70' of length. So far I have removed about 8ft of width. Is 4ft enough room to pile all the dirt? Is it safe to assume he can limit his pile to one side of the trench?

  2. #2
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    You had better ask your contractor.
    Depending on the soil conditions there may be limitations on how much he can pile close to the trench.
    The weight of the soil can contribute to trench collapse.
    I do not know the soil conditions where you live.

  3. #3
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    Soil here is pretty regular...not clay, not sand. After about a foot or two its rocky with small fieldstones...

    I figured the trench box is to prevent collapse of the trench, but that probably is limited in length and gets moved where the guy is working huh?

    I can't get a hold of him till monday and project save the lawn is going down this weekend! If he can't pile close to the trench then what? Split on either side? What is typically done?

    I had a 4ft trench dug in the back yard not to long and I remember how much dirt came out of that one. The trench was more V shaped, I'm guessing this one will be more box or squared shape since they prob need working room near the bottom and also space for the trench box.

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    A large tarp or heavy plastic will help removing the dirt pile with some reduction in turf damage if it isn't down for a long period of time.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5
    Network Engineer rmelo99's Avatar
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    Found this article. I'm going to remove about a 20ft+ width of SOD to be on the safe side.

    http://www.associatedcontent.com/art...ine.html?cat=6

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The dirt will be piled to one side so make your sod cut appropriately.

  7. #7
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
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    When I do sewer repairs and trenches, I always lay down 8x4 plywood sheets to put the spoils on. It has always made clean up of the spoils much easer, and protected the surrounding grass.

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