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Thread: Rotor Heads Exposed

  1. #1
    DIY Member vaman's Avatar
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    Default Rotor Heads Exposed

    Last fall I replaced all of the Hunter rotor heads on my system. Despite filling the dirt back in, some of the heads remain exposed above the ground. Attaching them to the supply line was straightforward and I can tell that they are perpendicular to the supply line.The most obvious one is about 1/2 " above. Anyone else had this happen and if so what is the solution?

  2. #2
    Irrigation Contractor Fireguy97's Avatar
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    When you say that, "They are perpendicular to the supply line", does that men that they are attached to the supply line with a tee fitting that is vertical and connected to the head with a nipple, or connected to the supply line with a swing joint?

    Mick

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    DIY Member vaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fireguy97 View Post
    When you say that, "They are perpendicular to the supply line", does that men that they are attached to the supply line with a tee fitting that is vertical and connected to the head with a nipple, or connected to the supply line with a swing joint?

    Mick
    They are connected with a tee fitting. The supply line is perectly horizontal so I don't understand how some of the heads could be above ground now.

  4. #4
    Irrigation Contractor Fireguy97's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vaman View Post
    They are connected with a tee fitting. The supply line is perectly horizontal so I don't understand how some of the heads could be above ground now.
    Did you replace the heads with the exact same brand and style? If you did that, then you could have simply exposed the top of the head, unscred it, removed the 'guts' and spring and replaced it with the new 'guts', spring and top leaving only the old body still in the ground.

    Was the replacemant head the same length as the old heads?

    If connected to a tee, the nipple could either be too long or not in the fitting or the head deep enough. If you backfilled the soil aroung the heads with out compressing it, the soil around the heads would have compressed over time and given you the impression the the heads were up, when actually, the soil is down.

    The biggest reason that I don't install systems with a vertical tee is that there is no 'give' if a hard object comes in contact with the sprinkler head. Either the head, the tee, or the pipe will break. If the lines are installed with the tee flat, or horizontal with a swing joint or a flex joint, then there is a lot more 'give' in the line. This way the head has flexibility in all directions. At the most you might have to replace a marlex fitting, but that is simple and costs pennies. It's also a lot easier to place the head at the exact height of the turf when backfilling.

    Give me a few minutes and I'll get some pictures of the two styles.

    Mick

  5. #5
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Sprinkler heads of any brand and style should be connected with a swing joint made with "funny pipe" and elbows. This not only allows for adjust the sprinklers to the proper level, it allow some "give" if the head is stepped on or run over by equipment. Saves digging up the lawn and repairing broken main lines.

  6. #6
    DIY Member vaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fireguy97 View Post
    Did you replace the heads with the exact same brand and style? If you did that, then you could have simply exposed the top of the head, unscred it, removed the 'guts' and spring and replaced it with the new 'guts', spring and top leaving only the old body still in the ground.

    Was the replacemant head the same length as the old heads?

    If connected to a tee, the nipple could either be too long or not in the fitting or the head deep enough. If you backfilled the soil aroung the heads with out compressing it, the soil around the heads would have compressed over time and given you the impression the the heads were up, when actually, the soil is down.

    The biggest reason that I don't install systems with a vertical tee is that there is no 'give' if a hard object comes in contact with the sprinkler head. Either the head, the tee, or the pipe will break. If the lines are installed with the tee flat, or horizontal with a swing joint or a flex joint, then there is a lot more 'give' in the line. This way the head has flexibility in all directions. At the most you might have to replace a marlex fitting, but that is simple and costs pennies. It's also a lot easier to place the head at the exact height of the turf when backfilling.

    Give me a few minutes and I'll get some pictures of the two styles.

    Mick
    I have some pictures and the line which I will attach on a new post. They will probably explain it better than my words.

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