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Thread: water pours out from sprinkler turn on

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member evp's Avatar
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    Default water pours out from sprinkler turn on

    I am a new home owner and I am trying to turn on my sprinkler system for spring. I had the irrigation company turn it on last spring and then winterize. But when I turn on the main water valve in the basement, water pours out of the white open discharge pipe with the threads on to the rocks in the photo, instead of traveling up through the first valve to the PVB bell and then through the second valve to the irrigation duct going to the ground.

    I remember the irrigation guy last year said something about the water needing to be directed to the bell and the water pressue to seal the bell.

    In the photo, I have the first valve open and the second valve closed (trying to seal the bell), but water still flows down the open discharge pipe. I have tried to have both valves open, but water ends up the same way. I remember last year that there was a screw cap on the discharge pipe but I don't remember how the irrigation guy used it.
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  2. #2
    Plumbing Contractor for 49 years johnjh2o1's Avatar
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    That is not a discharge pipe. It needs to be caped. It looks like it is used to hook up to a air comperssure to winterize the system.

    John

  3. #3
    Irrigation Contractor Fireguy97's Avatar
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    Yeah, What John said. It looks like you'll need a 1" threaded cap. Not sure on the size of the pipe, but it looks like 1" in the picture. Don't forget to get your backflow assembly tested.

    Mick

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member evp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fireguy97 View Post
    Yeah, What John said. It looks like you'll need a 1" threaded cap. Not sure on the size of the pipe, but it looks like 1" in the picture. Don't forget to get your backflow assembly tested.

    Mick
    What's the backflow assembly?

  5. #5
    Plumbing Contractor for 49 years johnjh2o1's Avatar
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    It's the brass assembly that the PVC is connected to. It needs to be tested yearly.

    John

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    Irrigation Contractor Fireguy97's Avatar
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    This is one of the types of a Backflow Assembly. You have a pressure vacuum breaker or PVB.


    Like John said, most municipalities want it tested when the irrigation system water is turned on, but is still has to be tested once a year, or tested if it has been moved or repaired.

    Mick

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member evp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fireguy97 View Post
    This is one of the types of a Backflow Assembly. You have a pressure vacuum breaker or PVB.


    Like John said, most municipalities want it tested when the irrigation system water is turned on, but is still has to be tested once a year, or tested if it has been moved or repaired.

    Mick
    how is backflow assembly tested? what's involved?

  8. #8
    Plumbing Contractor for 49 years johnjh2o1's Avatar
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    It must be done by a certified back flow tester it's not a DIY job.

    John

  9. #9

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    That setup looks like a potential disaster.

    1. That threaded pvc tee connection is ripe for breaking. Never go male copper to female pvc.

    2. Get rid of that above ground pvc pipe. Its gonna break. You want copper pipe instead.

    2. PVB needs to be rotated 90 degrees so a tester has access to testcocks.

  10. #10
    Irrigation Contractor Fireguy97's Avatar
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    I agree with the first two points, but the third doesn't have to be changed. I've tested lots of PVB's that were tighter than that.

    Mick

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