(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: dishwasher drain/bathroom sink

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member bpap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    15

    Default dishwasher drain/bathroom sink

    I recently purchased a new bathroom sink with 1 1/4" pop up drain. I planned on replacing the pvc p-trap with a chrome p-trap, but have come across a problem.

    The dishwasher is located on the other side of the wall from the bathroom sink. The previous owner had the dishwasher drain hose connected to the bathroom sink p-trap via a tailpiece in the drain pipe. I threw away the pvc pipe that was there before taking a close look at how exactly it was done.

    My problem is that there does not seem to be 1 1/4" chrome pipe with a tailpiece fitting for a dishwasher hose. This is only sold in the 1 1/2" chrome pipe, which I think is used for kitchen sinks. I was told that you cannot connect a dishwasher drain to a 1 1/4" bathroom sink drain.

    My questions are, is it correct that the dishwasher drain should never be connected to a bathroom sink drain? If so, do I have any options to correct this? Unfortunately the kitchen is set up so that the kitchen sink is about 10 feet away from the dishwasher.

    Thanks for any help or suggestions.

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    Any plumbing supply house should have a 1 1/4" wye tailpiece. They are used all the time arount here for A/C condensate drain connections.

    That said, I don't like the sound of your dishwasher hookup. There may be problems...no air gap, flex pipe through the wall, etc. These are code issues. If it is working OK for you, we don't argue with success, but these issues may come up later on...like if you were selling the house, or doing other work and an inspector was called in.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member bpap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Thanks jimbo.

    OK, so for a temporary solution I could just buy something like this:
    http://doitbest.com/Pvc+Dishwasher+C...sku-440516.dib
    and attach that to the sink drain and then the p-trap to the botton of the wye piece, right?

    For the long term, is there any solution other than moving the dishwasher next to the sink and having a proper hookup under the kitchen sink with an air gap?

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    In the Trades Wally Hays's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    652

    Default

    well, I have sifted through the code books and for the life of me I cn not see any reason why you can't drain the DW into the lav using that tailstock. You may still need to use an air break up under the lav depending on your local code.
    Perception is 3/4 of reality

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,653

    Default

    The "air break" would be in the countertop near the dishwasher, not UNDER the lavatory. They make threaded and slip joint branch tailpieces. Which one you use will depend on how much drop there is from the drain fitting to the trap.

  6. #6
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    That would work if you have room. They also make one which has fine threads on it instead of the slip joint nut. If your lav drain is metal with a threaded tailpiece, it replaces that.



    I was referring to the possible lack of an air gap, and what sounds like a flex drain hose passing through a wall. Code would not really accept that! But again, you sometimes are stuck with what you got!
    Last edited by jimbo; 04-04-2010 at 02:18 PM.

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member bpap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    15

    Default

    OK, I have this:
    http://www.vintagetub.com/asp/produc...item_no=P0001S

    It doesn't seem like it would be possible to replace the threaded pipe in the link above with the one you are showing. The one you show doesn't have the overflow holes and more importantly it doesn't seem like the threaded section is long enough to hold the pop-up and the the rubber gasket and nut. Its entirely possible I'm misunderstanding something though.

    I had thought I could just attach the compression fitting version to the end of the drain (show in the link above). If necessary I would use a pipe cutter to adjust the length of the drain piece if it was too long. That my be the wrong approach though.

    Once again, thanks for any help.

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,653

    Default

    Your drain does not have the removable tailpiece that the threaded one would work with, so you need the slip joint version. I am not sure what you mean by "pipe cutter" but unless it is a "tubing cutter" it will damage the pipe before it cuts it. You will probably have to cut both the drain and extension to make things short enough. Why did you use that drain, since they typically have a very poor performance.

  9. #9
    DIY Junior Member bpap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    15

    Default

    OK, thanks hj. I did mean tubing cutter. I am only using this drain because that is what came with the faucet that I ordered. If there is a drain that would perform better and would be more ideal for my situation I would be happy to get it. Would you have any specific suggestions? Is there something specific about this drain that performs poorly. I should probably mention that the faucet is a bridge faucet, so the center hole in the sink cannot be used for a lift rod for a pop-up drain. The center just has a nickel hole cover over it now.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •