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Thread: Choosing the right pipe size for Dornbracht shower fixtures.

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  1. #1
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Default Choosing the right pipe size for Dornbracht shower fixtures.

    We have started a fantastic shower renovation here in Yaletwon, Vancouver. The shower will be trimmed out with some great lights and an amazing Dornbracht package.

    We shut the water off to the condo yesterday and removed as much of the condo's old Poly B as we could and installed some new 3/4" supply lines for the shower - both hot and cold.

    My client is concerned that the 3/4" pex pipe will not produce the same volume as say 3/4" copper. The condo has it's own isolation valves so switching at this point is not the end of the world but I have never seen a shower valve roughed in with 1" pex before - that said I have never installed so many German fixtures in one shower before.

    Is there a huge difference in flow rate? I'm sure the valves on the Dornbracht fixtures can not handle this much water as not many homes have this same set up as a condo. I have email Dornbracht and look into this further before proceeding with any more work.

    A sneak peak at our project...


    http://www.dornbracht.com/en/index.htm?nav=1051&cid=5
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    Last edited by johnfrwhipple; 05-15-2010 at 05:58 AM.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    I don't have a spec sheet handy, but I would guess that 3/4" PEX might be suitable for 6 to 8 gallons per minute. If you go higher, you may exceed acceptable velocity range, and may experience excess pressure drop. So I would start by figuring out the GPM draw of whatever is being put in. As you are in Canada, you may not get the visit from the algore about that water usage, but he does extend his influence world wide!

  3. #3
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    Default Measuring water volume through flow testing

    6 gallon per minute GPM [US, liquid] or 22.712 470 704 liter per minute

    8 gallon per minute GPM [US, liquid] or 30.283 294 272 liter per minute

    A personal volume test in my home here in North Vancouver with a 3/4" water line at 104 PSI passing through 10' of 3/4" pex pipe with 2 couplings and 2 1/4 turn 3/4" shut off's produced 1.15 litres per second or

    18.24 gallon per minute GPM [US, liquid] or 69.045 910 94 liter per minute

    I'm waiting on feed back from Dornbracht.

    Who out there has set up a similar test or measured results from their personal project?

    Any insight or suggestions are welcome.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  4. #4
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Geez....what are you running at 104 PSI? And what is the water velocity in Feet per second? You can make water flow, but excessive velocity will wear fittings, pipes, and valve components!

  5. #5
    Nuclear Engineer nukeman's Avatar
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    18.24 GPM = 2.446 ft^3/min

    Nominal ID for 3/4" PEX = 0.671 in

    Flow area = pi*D^2/4 = 0.3536 in^2 = 0.002456 ft^2

    Velocity = 2.446/0.002456 = 995.9 ft/min = 16.6 ft/s

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    I think you are exceeding the velocity to get that volume. This can lead to premature wear. Normally, 80psi is the max recommended in a house, and most people live quite well with less.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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