(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Optimal PSI for house water

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    DIY Member shluffer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    81

    Default Optimal PSI for house water

    I noticed that my water supply from the street has a peasure reducing fitting on it. The preasure is currently set to 25 PSI and it has a range from 25-75 PSI. I am looking to install an RODI system, which requires water preasure of at least 50 PSI.

    I have a couple of questions about this:
    1) i have an old house with old plumbing. How much of a risk is it to increase the PSI to 50 or 60?
    2) Is there an optimal PSI to set it to? Is it better off at this lower number (and I'll need a pump ofr the RODI) or is a higher preasure better?
    3) The preasure gage has been on the pipe for years. Do they go bad? Should i replace the gage before increasing the preasure to make sure its reading correctly?

    I'm thinking that this is also the reason that we don't allways get great water preasure in the shower upstairs, and that it takes forever for our washing machine and dishwasher to fill.

    Thanks in advance for the help.
    Last edited by shluffer; 03-08-2010 at 07:17 PM.

  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,605

    Default

    My customers would NEVER be satisfied with anything less than 60 to 75 psi at the house. How long does it take you to fill a glass of water at that abysmal pressure? If the plumbing cannot handle at least 60 psi, then it will not be long before you have problems at 25 psi.

  3. #3
    DIY Member shluffer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    81

    Default

    I would agree with your customers. The preasure is ridiculous.

    Filling a glass of water takes way to long. I fill 5 gallon buckets for my fish tank. it takes forever.

    Do I replace the preasure gage to conferm that its correct, or should I just start increasing the preasure?

    When I increase the preasure, do I do it all at once, or should I do it slowly over a couple of days?

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,381

    Default

    Buy yourself a new gauge to check the one installed. You shouldn't need to ramp the pressure, you should be able to just go there. Keep in mind that if you have a weak valve or seal, it may start to leak, but that should be obvious and it should just go down the drain while you look around. IF something let go, you'd hear the flow while you were adjusting things. With the PRV, you should have an expansion tank. This (depending on the type) will often have a bladder. That bladder needs to have its air charge increased to the same value as the pressure you are making the water. You can only adjust that pressure when the water pressure is off (i.e., the supply closed and a valve open to relieve any pressure in the line).

    The increased flow might dislodge any accumulated crud in the lines, and you may need to clean showerheads, faucet aerators, etc. out from the crud.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5
    DIY Member shluffer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    81

    Default

    I don't have an expansion tank. My valve looks like the Watts Water Pressure Reducing Valve Series 25AUB-Z3 3/4" (0069717). I tried to include a link but it gets ****** out.

    The adjustment is just a screw that you srew in to increase the preasure. I have a similar (smaller) device on my boiler which works the same way.

    I was under the impression that expansion tanks are used when there is hot water is involved to prevent the preasure from increasing as the water heats. That would not be the case here.

    Is there a bladded that may be hidden somewhere, or am I still at just increasing the preasure?
    Last edited by shluffer; 03-09-2010 at 10:14 AM.

  6. #6
    Master Plumber-Gas Fitter shacko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rosedale, Md
    Posts
    561

    Default

    "I was under the impression that expansion tanks are used when there is hot water is involved to prevent the preasure from increasing as the water heats. That would not be the case here."

    You have a water heater don't you? expansion tanks will keep your T+P valve from leaking when the heater is on; you always need them when you have a PRV in your system and when the municipal system has a check valve in it.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •