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Thread: Fixing a very tiny leak in CPVC

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member BrettS's Avatar
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    Default Fixing a very tiny leak in CPVC

    OK, so I got my new shower plumbed in early yesterday using CPVC supply lines (the whole house was done in CPVC). I let the CPVC cement cure and then repressurized the system. I checked all of my connections several times over the next few hours and everything seemed dry. After I woke up this morning I checked them once more and discovered that the T fitting where I connected to the water supply apparently has a very tiny leak... there was one drip on the bottom of it where the pipe enters the T. It didn't appear to be dripping down the pipe and it didn't seem to have any water underneath it in the wall cavity, so it's definitely a really small leak.

    Unfortunately it's in a dreadful place to get to, which probably explains why it leaks in the first place... I suspect I knicked the end of the pipe with the saw as I was cutting it. It's in the wall, halfway behind the water heater, behind a 2 inch drain and a 1.5 inch supply for the fire sprinklers. I know that I really should cut out the T and glue in a new one, but because of the accessibility issues I'm considering trying to just use some epoxy to seal it.

    Should I go ahead and cut it out and do it the right way or do you think the epoxy might be a good permanent solution? I suppose I already know what you're going to say, but I'm really not looking forward to cutting that thing out and replacing it

    Thanks,
    Brett

  2. #2
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    cutting it out and repiping it is the only solution I would consider.

  3. #3
    Master Plumber-Gas Fitter shacko's Avatar
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    "If you don't have the time to do it right, where will you find the time to do it over"

  4. #4
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    A plumber would quickly cut that section out, and redo it.

    Someone less then a plumber would think it to death.
    The problem doesn't get better by ignoring it.
    Fix it and get some sleep tonight.

  5. #5
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Notwithstanding the opinion of everyone's miracle worker Billy Mays, anything you apply to the OUTSIDE of a pressurized system is likely to fail. It is just a bandaid, even if it initially appears to hold

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    You do not know if the material is compatible with the CPVC over time, or if it will deteriorate the piping. You also do not know if the bonding, assuming it stops the leak initially, will hold over the long haul. Cut it out and do it over.

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member BrettS's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies, guys. I knew what I needed to do from the beginning, but I just needed a little kick in the head to get me to actually do the right thing I actually haven't done anything with it yet, but I'm going to go ahead and cut out and replace that fitting. I did pick up a PVC cable saw which should make it much easier to cut through the pipe without damaging it.

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