(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Basement Bathroom Flooring options

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member mrmichaeljmoore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    128

    Default Basement Bathroom Flooring options

    I am having a full basement bathroom installed and just wanted to ask a few questions regarding flooring choices.
    Half of the basement is already finished. So, we will be breaking through the wall that separates the finished from the unfinished side and adding a bathroom there.

    The current finished area is on 2x4 sleepers with 3/4 plywood and covered in carpet.
    So the bathroom is framed out with 2x4 sleepers glued and red Tapcon screwed into the cement, with 3/4 tongue and groove underlayment sub-floor.

    We were all set to do tile, but I found through a little bit of research that tile over concrete sleepers is a recipe for disaster. Moisture/dampness equals movement of 2x4s and therefore cracked grout/tile.

    So, if we decide not to rip up the current floor and do a mudjob, then tile, what are our other options?

    Can we do a engineered hardwood on top of 2x4 sleepers?
    I'd rather not do vinyl or linoleum...

    Any advice is greatly appreciated!

    mm

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,388

    Default

    Engineered hardwood can go over that, but you have to temper that with the moisture that may come from the bath itself. Most of those require installation over a vapor barrier, so moisture from below isn't the killer, potentially that from above might be. Of the available brands, my preference is www.kahrs.com. They've been in the wood flooring business over 150-years, and it's the only thing they do - they do it well. You'd have to see what they recommend. I'd check on www.johnbridge.com for thoughts on tiling what you have. Lots more experienced tilers there.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member mrmichaeljmoore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    Engineered hardwood can go over that, but you have to temper that with the moisture that may come from the bath itself. Most of those require installation over a vapor barrier, so moisture from below isn't the killer, potentially that from above might be. Of the available brands, my preference is www.kahrs.com. They've been in the wood flooring business over 150-years, and it's the only thing they do - they do it well. You'd have to see what they recommend. I'd check on www.johnbridge.com for thoughts on tiling what you have. Lots more experienced tilers there.

    The folks at John Bridge and *********....plus a few other sites, said that tiling over concrete on sleepers is not a good idea at all. In fact, they all pretty much said that it will fail...
    Thats why I started this new thread to try to find alternatives....

    If we dont rip out what we have already and do a mud job, engineered hardwood floor may be the way to go....

    ugh.

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member JOHN_P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    23

    Default

    You might consider looking at Stilelock ceramic tiles. A few weeks ago Lowes just started carrying these and I thought the idea was interesting. Ceramic tiles with no grouting. Essentially they are ceramic tiles encased in a very hard but somewhat flexible carrier that has tongue and groove to fit them together. It ends up looking just like a grouted ceramic tile floor. I was the first one to buy them from our local Lowes so I had no opinions to go on, but in the end it worked out great. I was all done with the flooring, had it cut around the rounded corners of my cast iron tub, then a week later decided to bust out the cast iron tub and replace it with something different. So I needed to redo that row of tiles, just pulled out that row and added a new row and it was done. If I had done ceramic tile and grouting it would have meant busting up some of the tile I just put down. Anyhow, without getting too long winded, for a basement application, I think it would be ideal since there is no grouting to deal with. It's a free-floating setup just like much of the tongue/groove flooring. It's expensive at about $7/sq ft and after initially cursing it, I find that it makes for a great solution and will be using it again for another area in our basement.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,172

    Default

    I second the Delta FL suggestion.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •