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Thread: Multiple White and Ground Wires in Bus Bar.

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Default Multiple White and Ground Wires in Bus Bar.

    Is it OK to connect multiple whites and ground under the same screw into the bus bar on a panel?
    "Any American who is prepared to run for President should automatically, by definition, be disqualified from ever doing so."
    Gore Vidal.

  2. #2
    DIY Member Lightwave's Avatar
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    Generally you're only allowed to do that if the manufacturer specifically allows it in the panel documentation or spec sheet.

    If you're out of screw spaces you can run a pigtail inside the panel.

  3. #3
    Electrical Contractor Jim Port's Avatar
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    Grounded conductors need to be one per hole, no sharing.

    Grounding conductors can typically share with other grounding conductors. Check the label for allowable sizes and number.

    If additional spaces are needed an auxillary grounding buss bar can be added for the grounding conductors only.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    My inspector once told me the panel is NOT a junction box and did not want "wire nuts" inside the enclosure.

  5. #5
    Electrical Contractor Jim Port's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    My inspector once told me the panel is NOT a junction box and did not want "wire nuts" inside the enclosure.
    Your inspector may want to review Article 312.8.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lightwave View Post
    If you're out of screw spaces you can run a pigtail inside the panel.
    A problem with this could occur if the wires spliced were from the same leg of the panel. The current would be additive and could overload the wire. This is why the hots need to be on opposite legs in the multi-wire branch circuit.
    Last edited by Jim Port; 03-10-2010 at 01:20 PM.

  6. #6
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    My inspector once told me the panel is NOT a junction box and did not want "wire nuts" inside the enclosure.
    Ask him/her for a code reference on that as they are very wrong.

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