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Thread: help removing crushed fitting?

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member mrs.fixit's Avatar
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    Default help removing crushed fitting?

    Help! I'm replacing lead drain lines in my bathroom in a house built in 1960. After much struggle, I finally removed a galvanized elbow from a fitting connected to the cast iron ideal bend with a 36 wrench. Unsure what material the threaded nipple was made of, I thought I'd be safe and remove it too and use male pvc adapters to run pvc drain lines to connect both the bathtub and sink drains to the ideal bend.

    In trying to remove the threaded nipple, I crushed it-- but it still wont back out of the cast iron. In hindsight, I probably should have left the nipple and just used a mission-type coupling, but here I am now. I am worried that if I keep trying with the pipe wrench Ill shear it off. How can I remove the nipple? I am considering using a sawzall to make several slits in the nipple up to the bend and trying to break out the pieces by grabbing them with channel locks. Is that a good/bad idea? Other ideas on how to get it out without damaging the bend? I'd appreciate any ideas.

    Here are some pictures:

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  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member asktom's Avatar
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    First, cut the nipple off flush (or thereabouts) with the fitting. Then, make two cuts near each other inside the nipple, going just deep enough that the threads start to show. At that point you should be able to chisel out the little "pie wedge" you cut. After that fold in the remaining chunk by chiseling near the edge of the cut until it bends in enough that you can use that big old screwdriver you have to continue the folding it in. At some point you will be able to grab it with pliers, twist, and pull it out.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member mrs.fixit's Avatar
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    That took some time but worked! I'm sure this is a somewhat common problem but couldn't find an answer through the internet searches I did. Thank you for helping me out.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    1960? That fitting and lead piping were either "illegal", or obsolete, a long time before that.

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